(In)Visibility and Art [& suffering]

Today, after 9-10 days of a horrific infection, I found myself feeling human enough to do some actual work. We’re organizing a conference about art and visibility, my PhD friends and I. More info coming soon! So I started writing the stuff we need to move forward today.

But what it made me think about was visibility within healthcare, and illness, and art.

I started thinking about Greenberg ( visibility of the aesthetics of experience), – and then about  the Cubists and other Post-Impressionists perspectives being  particularly poignant for illness and suffering.

But contemporarily, how  are we and can we understand someone else’s pain or convey our own to others? How do we make sense of the nonsensical, whether the chaos of life-as-lived or the inscrutability of dying? How do we answer the questions “Why me?” and “Why now?” when we are diagnosed with disease? How do we paint what we know is there but cannot see?  These are heavy questions which lie sullen at the bottom of every action within my PhD enquiry. Modern medicine, like much pre-Impressionistic art, tried to square this circle by instituting a technical and professional gaze that filters out the ephemera of the individual in order to identify and name what is hidden by opaque bodies (see, of course, Foucault 1994).

But this is not arts aim; it’s not a reductive attempt to discover the building blocks common to all landscapes or buildings or humans or musical instruments. It’s to uncover the essence of a thing, that particular thing, in order to reveal more.

Our representations of disease may actually conceal even as they seek to reveal. We know that socioeconomics and other social determinants (e.g., discrimination, exposure to violence, lack of education and social support, etc.) are tied to health and risk of illness and disease. We also know that socioeconomics and other social determinants affect prognosis and recovery. (Read Michael M’s The Health Gap for more of this)

Although the media love to highlight the enemy on our borders threatening to disrupt our safe worlds insulated from many of the realities of danger and suffering, it is actually our capacity for self-destruction that constitutes our greatest foe: poverty, poor nutrition, lack of access to care, neglect of mental illness, climate change, and war, both declared and undeclared. But far easier to wind up a distant epidemic and see a remote danger to ourselves (while thousands die in a distant place) than address our real threats. Despite many genuine humanitarian responses from wealthier “first-world” countries, it is still clear that we have primitive protective responses (at home and abroad) that largely ignore the real wolves at the door.

As the NHS looms on a crisis that was caused my a greedy, beaurocratic , irresponsible government, and Brexit heightens tensions, and Donald Trump’s inauguration starts to truly loom ahead, I got thinking.

Thinking about  all of this, I wonder if art is our tool to help both recognize suffering but also help build bridges with communities we have trouble connecting with due to these issues.  If the digital world fosters isolation, what evokes empathy? Which of our personas do we believe in—our social media portraits or our reflections in the mirror? What are the consequences of a digitally-created society in the psyche of the global community? Art *can* cross boundaries, social class, geolocked nations. It exists in between physical, real and the social-digital world.  It links us through history, makes the other seem friendly, it can hold up a mirror when everything else seems shattered and untrue. Art explores the complicated yet timeless questions of influence, superficiality, and powerlessness.

When I was first an art-student, I remember finding and learning all about this activist art history. From Ad Reinhardt creating “communist” comics under a false name and being investigated by the FBI, to more direct examples such as the Gorilla Girls, and PAD-D groups. They made work with a political edge.  It was so exciting! I wondered about how awesome it would have been, to be growing up in such a polarized and politically difficult time and then being involved in such grassroots political activity and art being the tool, or the process.  Almost a license to get it out there and be archived for the future. But that same political drive, was also given to the artworld too – Gregory Scholette of PAD-D continues writing about art and political activism with his artwork representing his ideals and holding the artworld accountable for its Dark Matter, Reinhardt wrote lots of essays – as published in “Art as Art” with his disgust of the commercialization of art.

Of course, now I found myself, in a much different world than 8 years ago where hope resided, and people were less obvious and less aggressive with their hate. Where politically, things all felt relatively stable and fine. I have since lost my political art naivety that I had then, and I don’t feel the same excitement as I did when I first found it —- but what does remain is my gut feeling that art CAN make a difference, and my passion in the use of criticality esp within a political art canon. Art can be urgent and important and poignant.

I wonder about all of these experiences, and lessons. And I think – yeah, it’s our turn to make the invisible – visible. We are traumatized witnesses, some of us accomplices, groping about in the gap between passive outrage and mobilized action. We are both: perpetrators and victims, objects and subjects endlessly exchanging roles.

It’s our turn to show that mirror to those who can’t see a reflection. It’s our turn to help people practice empathy, to feel less powerless, to make people accountable, to stand up for what is right – and I think it’s about time the artworld got out of it’s comfort zone.

I’m not sure what that looks like for me.  Some artists are already doing it. But our Art is about changing the world, rather than study how it is. It’s not just about making things, but making things happen. There is much proof out there that our common community has not been relinquished.

Is art sufficient to the task of unpacking these contradictions that lie within our society – or should it complicate matters further? Such questions are unanswerable, but we shall see and we shall do.

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The world isn’t yet done.

Being freelance and working from home, I slowly turned into a sucker for cooking shows like Masterchef, The Great British Bake-Off, The Taste, Come-Dine-With me, and almost anything on the Food Network. No cooking show was too long or too low-brow and underproduced for me.  I thought it was probably an age thing – I never watched this stuff when I was younger: turned out it was just a love of different foods (probs due to aging-maturity) but I think it was more to do with avoiding doing work/relaxation thing. This became clearer as a healthcare student – I watched these shows even more religiously. The MasterChef series is ALWAYS on when I’m trying to revise for exams or have 100 deadlines. Trying to avoid reality.

One day after clinical placement, my housemates and I sat down with our food to eat and watch food on the TV. This was a show about a bunch of chefs trying to make it in this Italian restaurant/bakery engrained in tradition and processes. One of the young chefs tries to take a bunch of short-cuts and the older chefs catches him – and tells him off – saying, “that’s not how we do it here! We do it the long, hard, stupid way”. Which is stuff like not using yesterdays bread, making fresh new bread instead, making the soup from scratch. ect ect.

And this really stuck with me. The Long-Hard-Stupid-Way.

I think I do everything the long, hard, stupid way. I often get told this. If there’s an easy or a hard way – you can guarantee that i’ll find the hardest way first. My mom says it’s because I don’t have any common sense.

But I started thinking about the routes I’ve taken to get where I am now. And I wonder if I could take an easier path – would i have taken it? The answer is probably no. And I started finding pleasure in reflecting upon this rough, hard-stupid-way path.

There’s a whole spectrum of – here’s the long hard stupid way  – which is ultimately the way I seem to be compelled to make & do things, and then at the other end we have super efficient way over there.

When you work the long hard stupid way – it looks a lot like worrying, scratching new ideas, endless notebooks, trying to learn things you’d never dream of  doing before, it’s a lot of others looking at you like you’ve got it wrong, it’s staying up late and then having to get up early the next day (killer), it’s not returning your library books on time,  but all of these actions are inspired by just caring a lot.

That’s not to say you can’t be efficient and not care deeply – but i, personally, don’t know how to do that.

But behind the long-hard-stupid way is a gift. It’s a lot of heart.

It’s staying up late, and sketching out plans and learning how to code smart-phone apps (FYI – it’s not the same as making a website which I originally thought it would be. Just because you know italian doesn’t mean you’ll be able to speak french), and taking the time to make it – without ever thinking about having a plan to make it accessible. Turns out making apps is a rollercoaster.

It’s going through a really testing health-issue, that literally breaks who you are – and makes you question everything you are & your worth– and going through the system that doesn’t know what to do with you – because you’re not a child and not an old adult – and instead of being a normal person and try and change the system from the outside, you decide to re-train and try to make the difference yourself,  inside the system.

It’s deciding to apply for things you’ll probably never get accepted to do – for the love of learning new things, and the process, and meeting new people – & ultimately hoping that the rejection and the attempt itself  will lead to more change and things to build upon for the future.

And most of all, it’s deciding to do all of it together – at once. Long-hard-stupid-way.

Freelancing is often the long-hard-stupid-way. You’re never sure how much work you’re ever going to get. So you just say yes to pretty much everything, just on the off chance you hit a lull and therefore you’ll still have some money coming in.  All the while – burning yourself out. The thing is, you always work more hours than you get paid to work. Life-work balance is hard to strike. And you can never officially take a sick day.

Working alone is hard. Being your own investor is hard (& stupid sometimes). And running all of these things together – teaching, app making, website designing, conference drawing, illustration commissioning, clinical-student-ing, academic-working – all while feeling crappy & being broke- is super long, hard  & stupid – and to do it responsibly is even harder.

Learning to work your life-balances out is hardwork. And it’ll probably take you some long-hard-stupid-ways before you know when is the right time to say yes and when to say no. A friend of mine when i was feeling so awful from fatigue & I felt like i was letting people down told me – you gotta say no if you really want to say yes.

Would i have ever wanted to go straight into healthcare from school? The answer would have been hell-naw. I didn’t have the empathy. I didn’t have the experiences I have now. I needed to experience the hardship to gain the drive.

So even though the long, hard, stupid way is just that, what it produces is something cool. When we work this way, it sort of gains an empheral quality. It’s sort of in the air – everything always feels up in the air. Whenever we make things this way – either for ourselves or for other people. There’s some kind of value in that. And that value exists outside of commericalization or money. And I love that. It sort of becomes a gift.

The thing with gifts is that – you have to be given a gift. You can’t ask for one. The more a gift moves, the more value it gains (has it been passed on through the family, does it fill a gap – a representation of a bond, is it using someones time) — like wise – the more work you put into something – the more value is gained. Ultimately a gift  is a sacrifice.

Essentially the best work I do is when I say something or do something or give something , to really help people (in every/any way), or to people I really care about.

But the biggest potential is that – Doing things the long, hard, stupid way – you learn all sorts (mostly wrong things) – but you get a gift. Or you create a gift for others.

It’s that you can build a foundation or something for people. My practice is driven by my  belief in making things for other people. Whether that’s making time to listen and to help, making something to make people think, making something that will better their experience, making something that brings people together, to make someone laugh or feel heard. By making something for other people, by considering someone else it moves the edges of our beings closer together and we gain more overlap in the process.

And we should look at these overlaps, to talk to each other. to know what we all have in common and to create more situations to create more commonalities. And by doing this we can some how grasp the wonder that is so hard to grasp – of what lies in the heart of making – and making things the long, hard, stupid way.

And when I think about all the awful things this government is doing and pushing through – from ruining the NHS, and demoralizing Junior Doctors, to entrenching a future generation in 50,000 + debt for education, to cruel benefit changes, to making students criminals if they can’t pay back their student loan immediately after they’ve finished university, to trying to get rid of our human rights, to airstriking syria, to stopping free dinners for children who can’t afford to eat. It makes me so, so, so angry. And even helpless.

But the long, hard, stupid way is all about continuing to try, push and make something – we don’t care about barriers – or the challenges – or even the outcome: the gift that comes out of making things for others shows and says for  us to stop, look and look around us. It says everything is possible again. And the world isn’t yet done.

If we can find the courage, and the strength to make things (whatever that is) for others, we can give these gifts back to one another. There’s so much more what unites us than what separates us. People power goes a long way – even if its the long, hard, stupid way.

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What should you be spending more time on?

I’m self-employed, and a full-time clinical based health-care student – and professional poorly person.  So I can’t stop thinking about work. When you’re by yourself, it’s easy to overwork yourself.

I’ve realized recently that my family (my mom & my bro) is full of people who work very hard. They all work extremely hard and they enjoy it. It took years for me to figure out that that’s a trait that was passed onto me.

When I’m working, I’m being functional and useful to someone, but I’m also making money to pay the rent. When I can, I like to work on personal projects because it gives me an avenue for self-expression – and to try and make change. I can put work out on the Internet that people might like and, by extension, hopefully like me. Which is secretly a lot of what I want from my work.

What I’m realizing is that there are other areas of my life that need that same sort of focus and rigor that I give to work & sleep. There are friendships and relationships and things that are every bit as important.

There’s half of me that is very proud of the work that I’ve made and where it has taken me. But there’s another half of me that knows that I live in Leeds/Sheffield/Doncaster and that I’m very privileged to already have a masters,  be studying radiotherapy and making the work I’m making. When I was growing up, my mom worked 2 low-paid jobs – just to make rent. These days, she only works 1 low-paid job to try and make rent. No one ever told me i could or should go to university – because it wasn’t ever a thing, no one does that in my family. I just discovered it some how in the last year and half of school but my mom has always been so supportive of everything I do, she basically told me ‘Don’t just do something to make money, find something you love and find someone who appreciates you for it. And then try and get a job.’ Whilst she was drunk last weekend she told me to, “Try, take risks, fail doing stuff, because it doesn’t matter – this is always your home. You will always have a roof over your head. I just want you to be happy. I don’t care if you fail or get 100% – because you’ll get there — and I’m proud of you anyways.”

I’m always  aware of where I come from.  My friends parents know all about the league tables of the universities they attend, and their parents help them pay the rent.  They come from homes with hot-tubs, and convertible cars.  No one in my family understands the value of higher education. But it doesn’t mean they don’t support me – even if they think what I do (my art-freelancing stuff) “isn’t a real job” lol.    But I’m also aware of where I am now and how I can help more people get to where I am. Maybe a little thing that I do can make a difference, even if it’s just very slight.

That’s probably a bit naive, but these are big things that sometimes need to be reduced so we can start to deal with them. A tweet, blogpost, whatever, isn’t going to solve the problems we have with inequality and privilege, but it might help us slowly move incrementally to something better than what we currently have.

Empathy is first an act of imagination. I know how difficult it is to get from one side to the other. But if we spent more time teaching, sharing, learning, listening — I think we could make something better.

 

 

people are amazing

Yesterday I had the pleasure of drawing another cool thing for 1 small part of the NHS. The NHS Commissioning Board, the bit where Citizens who work within NHS stuff, or the voluntary sector, and innovators get together and share their ideas on how to make the NHS the best it can be, and how to move forward the work they are currently doing. How GP’s can work better and effectively with their communities, relieving pressures like A&E admissions and so forth.

I always love doing my day job of drawing other peoples plans, ideas, criticisms, or solutions. I’ve heard  so many amazing stories by drawing it for them, from the editor of W.I.R.E.D Magazine, AMAZING individuals who did a TED talk, people who work at Google and YouTube (Technically Google now), BBC, Guardian and so on. Folks at Channel 4 co-production producers (Embarrassing Bodies live, Big Fish ect) own some of my work. I love that. I go away and think, I’ve just drawn something I had NO idea about until right now. And I love it.

Yesterday was about the people though. I think I met (and in some cases – re-met ) some of the most nicest & smartest people, ever. I can’t really explain how sort of inspired I am by their actions and stories. How we all know that there is something urgent and something at stake here. And these people’s purposes, their motivation, is about making sure that in years to come – the NHS is still ours. I heard so many cool and great ,and even touching, things that CCG’s across England are doing. How doctors (GPs) are mega passionate about really getting to know their communities. What a wonderful job to have or a great thing to be a part of? These people, every single one – from the ‘citizens’, to the organizers, and nhs workers, to the doctors, ect ect – are trying to make something work, with genuine passion. (One speakers sentiment was that usually you don’t know that you’re in the midst of  GREAT HISTORICAL CHANGE when you’re in it, until you reflect years later). I went home and googled my local CCG Doncaster  (Good ol’ Donxx) and saw that we have an awesome and lively twitter account (@doncasterccg). And I felt that, and hope that, my Doncaster CCG is (or becoming) one of the innovators of the new system change. I hope they’ll represent and do our local population proud and well.  Although, I am hoping that soon I won’t be living in Doncaster, but whatever.

It got me thinking about the paths we take. This journey that I accidentally stumbled upon has reignited my hunger for social change/justice again (not that it ever went away, it’s just gone  a tinnnny-bit dormant publiclywhilst I’ve been fighting my mystery illness shizzle). I don’t really know where to start, but I believe my new collaborative project with Paul Harrison called F/O/R/C/E lectures (Free. Online. Radically. Collected. Education.) http://forcelectures.org/ is going to be the start of something BIG.

The tragic passing of Aaron Swarts (http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/01/aaron-swartz/)  – an acquaintance through a project I worked on in 2009 – but I saw him as a friend in the Facebook friendship sort of way because he was such a nice person    – has only made my commitment to our freedom for free education and healthcare even more  potent.

Guys, PEOPLE ARE AMAZING. There are so many people out there who are thinking of us. In a good way. (Some that are thinking of us to exploit us – but that’s another story) BUT the people who are doing great things are trying to stop those who are trying to exploit us. Don’t you wanna be a part of it? I wanna live in a better world, where inequalities are resolved, rather than ignored or taken as an almost given. I want those less able, or most vulnerable  or someone who might need some support for the first time in their life have someone to help them out. And the people I met yesterday represented LOADS of people across the UK trying, fighting, working extra unpaid hours, for us. Thank you, guys. If I ever see my hot GP again, which I’m sort of hoping I don’t. I totally just want to tell him what an awesome job he’s doing & how thankful I am for genuine, caring people who are taking care of stuff for us.

People are amazing. Yeah!positivity

Advise to myself, to-do-list, reminders for life generally.

remember everything is connected.   start anywhere.   learn to fail, or fail to learn.   master yourself.    create your own systems.    good questions are very important.    strike a balance between thinking and doing.    mind and body are not separate.     exercise.    walk when you can.     books and travel are more important than cars and houses.    keep a journal/sketchbook/blog.    every person is your teacher.     no segregation by age, gender, race or sexual orientation.

never forget that things change.  act or be acted upon.   learn to filter information.   enjoy the company of free spirits.   heart and head in equal masures.   creation > criticism.   reading is essential.   laugh when ever you can.    the world is not a burden.    keep a reading list.     never stop playing games.    dont hold peoples games against them.     decide which games you want to join.    feel free to change your mind.   money is a means not an ends.

resist cultural paranoia.  read nietzsche.  read kerouac.  study john cage.   self direction.   photography and video, but dont get lost in the medium.   loose connections are often as pivotal as close ones.   character is more powerful than public  opinion.   read emerson and theoreau.   swim in the sea.   why do you want the things you want?   when you feel sad, get active.  there’s always more work to do.   you are not your job.  be aware that the majority of the world is anti-intellectual.

majorities usually devolve to the lowest common denominator.   none-the-less learn  to work in groups.   most peoples ideas of “cheating” revolve around archaic systems.   as soon as you get power, disperse it.   absolute power corrupts absolutely.  ignore any of this if you need to.   involve yourself with things greater than you are.

have a mission.  think ahead.  leave a legacy.  economic injustice is nothing new.  economic injustice institutionalises racism.   don’t tune out poverty or madness.   help others who are close to you first.  people, NOT numbers.  socratic method = specific > general.  rationalism doesn’t explain everything.    learn from people as well as books.   spend some time in new york city.    try and be polite.   we wish to use history only insofar as it serves the living – Nietzsche.   life=thought.    infinite contingency.

follow links/subconsious flows.   1 -2- 1 relationships.   studio as a room of one’s own.    post studio art vs family living.    whose office can you borrow?   start your own business.  learn to forget the right things.   delegation of power as a means of democratic circulation.   learn to be your own best teacher.   your teachers are those who might be of some assistance.   homework is for slow students.    a good student assigns their own work.    if all you have is a hammer, every problem is  a nail.   what artwork isnt pedagogical to other artists?

academic but not dry.  my great moments of education so far involved flirtation.   sloppy, sexy, intellectualism.  crush as theory object.   feel free to have your own sense of humour.  charisma as commodity.   community building as enlightening self interest.  ideas are a dime a dozen.  fabrication for the masses.  intense boredom is a resource.   it’s a privilege  to be alive right now.  more hours in a day.   be so busy that rejection never fazes you.   lifelong learning.   buzzwords and data clouds.  uncommon sense is in demand and in short supply.  copy /paste/delete.   use your library card. easy come – easy go.  seperate your wants from needs.  whether for a job or a  lover,, make sure you want instead of need. don’t be needy.

don’t fear making mistakes in public, just keep going.   feminism taught – the personal is the political. surprise yourself.  our problems help give meaning to our lives,  in many respects giving is better than recieving.  never wait for freedom – seize it.

The Democratisation of the Art-World. Questions….

So, as you know, I’m one of ten awesome artists on Sites residency program this year. It’s pushing the investigation of participatory artwork. This post is not on what I’m doing, but more questioning what we’re doing in art in general. And I don’t mean we as in the 10 artists, but every single artist in the world that does the following! These thoughts aren’t part of the Site thing, these are my own views and no one elses. (Although I’m sure many others have written and thought about this.)

I wouldn’t class myself as an artist who works with the community; i just happen to work with the community every now again. Actually, i put stuff on and I hope that they turn up! HA! But another side is that I like to think that my work – that’s very individualistically made – voices or reveals the smoke that reveals the truth.  I like to think that my investigating power structures and systems – in what ever way that is – by revealing the democracy of information that surrounds us, it will allow us to reconsider our current position with in what ever system.  Since i’m a small minority – working class kid working in a middle class world, i feel like i’m representing my fellow working class folks! So here’s the question.

Can art ever really be participatory in an autonomous sense?  They say we can do anything, but then – what do the audience think when they walk through the door!?!  Participatory artists should definitely consider the audience they’re working with – especially on an ethical level. But, this ethical level gets switched when you’re sat waiting in the gallery for participants.

You’re not trying to invade a community of people with certain rituals or ideas, you’re engaging with the art-viewing public who should realistically be used to these types of surroundings.  But all of a sudden, i don’t get told to, it’s expected, almost instinctive, to greet the audience. Like customer service people do in shops. “Hey, How are you today?! Can I tell you our special offers in store today! If you need any help, just holla!” Because you know if you don’t – like a mystery shopper- they will think bad of the work or even you!  My role suddenly turns from artist – tryna push a project to the next stage, to Greeter. I don’t mind, in fact i’m happy to do it – any way to make projects clearer work better in our favour, but it’s this nagging thought in the back of mind – why is it almost expected?

Can art – social or participatory – push any boundaries anymore? Neo Liberalism has blurred these lines so much that it’s expected for me to be artist and greeter/worker within the same role and the same time – without it being explicitly linked to do with my work. Post Fordism et-al! The more people we get through the doors, the more work we can make. product, product, product.  evaluate evaluate evaluate. outcome outcome outcome. If it’s successful, what does it do? What does the final outcome look like. It can’t look like it belongs in the gallery. it needs to be good enough to be in the gallery. Where’s the process? The production line?

It gets democratized so much that certain things are expected. If it’s too different, it’s not working or doesn’t engage. If it’s too similar, it’s not risk-taking or interesting enough. You work to your audience. I’m pretty tired so these thoughts aren’t materialising as i’d like them to. But  I’ll leave you with this, as Greg Sholette stated in his e-flux essay titled: “After OWS: Social Practice Art, Abstraction, and the Limits of the Social”

– What is the limit of the social within the social itself?

 

 

Looks like Documenta 13’s website hacked

I like Documenta. I especially it’s publications from each exhibition. But I sort of love the unexpectedness of the find. I haven’t figured out if the Documenta home site has also been hacked, “CENTER FOR DEALING WITH THE PAST” it’s perfectly plausible. I hope it’s that subtle line between satirical and subversive.

Finding this has come at the right time too. I’m in an art-making funk, I usually get these around this time of year. I think it’s seasonal affective disorder, plus i’ve been crazy busy and working, and right now i have man-flu. But it has inspired a bunch of work I wanna do. I love drawing, but I realized the other day, that i miss being a bit rebellious and out there. Taking real physical risks.  Thanks Documenta Hackers for bringing it back, just in time too! 🙂 Watch this space, eh!?

The Network of Power: Adventures in Capitalism (work/part. 1)

Hello.

So I guess my new work is sort of a comic, but I don’t mind it being classed as a comic because… well, comic-artists are some of the coolest people I know. And they speak to a way bigger audience than you know – showy, polished gallery only artists. (Nothing wrong with gallery only artists though!). I think it’s a great platform to really experiment with a political narrative in a metaphorically, illustrative and poetic manner.

Here’s the 1st page. The intro page to chapter one: A Brief History of Time

The series is called: the Network of Power: Adventures in Capitalism.

The comic experiments and  entails re-imagining not just the content of history but how it is circulated: comparing folk traditions with grass-roots activism, both of which are passed from person to person rather than codified in a lecture or mass-media. However, despite this fascination with the past, my main concern is with the present, in the search for alternatives to our own remit as artists (and individuals), and the economic and social conditions that the ‘artist’ (or individual in general in society) is, traditionally, bracketed off from.

The comic mines history for such cases; i’m interested in movements organised by groups in order to empower individuals, which i then explores through a paranoid structure of poetic, funny realism. By doing so, I hope to also seek to reveal the converse of these examples, exploring present-day assumptions and structures that enforce social hierarchies.

 

 

i love this idea: life-drawing at #occupywallstreet

by/from amazing artist david horvitz’s blog

October 28, 2011 1:38 PM
LIFE_DRAWING_revision_V1

I am hosting a Life Drawing class This Sunday inside the Wall Street Occupation.

We will do sketches of the police officers who are stand on the periphery of the occupation.
Note: this is not intended to antagonize the police! We are just returning an attentive gaze. Their’s is one of surveillance, ours is more about shape, form, light, shadow, and line.