Looking For The Helpers

When we look across the world, we see a scenario that I don’t think we ever really thought we’d see. The world is shutting its doors to keep out an enemy it cannot see, smell or hear.

Now, some of us have waited our whole lives for state sanctioned introversion. One of my favourite books is the “Shy Radicals”. Yes please thankyouverymuch. But now that the option to come out of ourselves has been removed it doesn’t feel good. It doesn’t feel very good at all. Perhaps we have more in common with those folk who move through the world as if it were an amusement park. We’re just not very good at parties. But now there aren’t any parties to go to anyway.

And suddenly, I dunno about you, but I could do with a legendary house party, 1 of those ones you end up talking about for life.
None of us have any real idea of what is about to unfold, or how long this unfolding will take. Some of us are living week to week, pay cheque to pay cheque. We may be working from home, but only for as long as the companies we work for can keep going. We may run businesses that are trickling away before our very eyes. Some of us may have seen our (very small) savings – everything all those years of slog and sacrifice were meant to be worth it for – slip like sand through an hour glass in just a fortnight. Some of us may be ok. But if we don’t know what it is to come, how can we know for sure?

Here’s the thing about all of this. It’s a WE thing. Because for once in human history, every single one of us is affected and we are all in this together. And not in the way Conservative party says.

Not a single one of us can come away untouched from this – not even the millionaires and billionaires and government officials and beyond.

We are humans. We do some shitty things, but we also do some amazing things like: people continuing to be there on the frontlines to keep things moving as they should, and saving peoples lives. also we make some amazing art & music & scientific amazingness, and figured out that as well as making some excellent cheeses, mould can make life saving drugs. We also like to dress our pets up in clothes.
Right now, as I see it, we can only control ourselves. Everything else is out of our jurisdiction – but isn’t it always that way, much as we like to convince ourselves otherwise? So with that in mind, we have to sit this out. Take care of ourselves and each other as best we can. Eat well. Brush our teeth. Get some rest. Watch the bare minimum of news. Concentrate on only each day as it comes. Add gin where necessary.

Do what we can.

Those of you who can do basic lonely exploration – some how without much close physical contact- can you check in on neighbours and old folks and those who are super vulnerable? People are frightened, and rightly so – but as Mr Roger’s – the dude my friend  Colleen told me a lot about last summer – those who are uncertain – look for helpers, & those who aren’t *as* vulnerable & understands fully what’s going on or has something that is of use to other: BE the helper.

These are the moments that frame and create who we are, and how we will be looked back upon in history – And I want us to be collectively responsible (staying in, not doing anyyyy unnecessary socializing etc etc ) and being compassionate (understanding that if you go out in a massive group – you’re putting loads of people at risk/ understanding people are frightened and figuring out how to help others).

Suffering together, but together in kindness and support (at good distances, off)

In the meantime, let’s keep each other company (online and in fun creative different ways).

Stay well, and stay lucky.

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week 1 self isolation down: unhomelikeness

You’re not a human doing, you’re a human being.

I’ve been following the progress of C-19 for a long time. Since around Jan 20th. I was in Japan, walking through a market in Tokyo & my American friend was messaging me how I might get quarantined on my way home. LOL I said to Hayley showing her the messages. “Americans, they’re so OTT. If it was a big thing, we’d have seen/heard it whilst here wouldn’t we?”

So we left Japan, & we weren’t checked out nor quarantined. Nothing was different. But I wish we had been. All of us coming home from Asia, 2 weeks at home & anyone we’d have contact with also kept at home. To keep it in check. Instead, here we are. On lockdown of sorts. Cinemas, cafes, pubs, restaurants, universities, and schools closed. Now, I believe this is the best thing and should have happened about a week ago given the rate of deaths we’re at (177 at the time of writing) and infection numbers of only testing hospitalized patients.

I’ve been self-isolating since last Thursday. Since before the government announcement of attempting to work from home if possible on Tuesday. I’ve been watching other countries and I know where this is going. I’m a person who is at risk. I have super bad asthma, and a bunch of other long-standing issues – that’s well documented on the pages here. So it’s been a week of only walking the dogs alone outside. Everything else in my bedroom and on Skype.

Now I’ve been working from home most of my adult freelance life. At least 2 days a week. So I should be used to it. But I will level with y’all, I have found this week really, really hard. By Wednesday I wondered why I was struggling given the fact that this was my normal activity last year.

The girl who lost most of 2012 and beginning of 2013 to insane fatigue and pain and spent around 8 months laid in bed most of the time, & when she wasn’t would just dream of being back in the bed – is now feeling trapped and uncomfortable in the same space.

I usually love working from home. No horrible Northern Rail commute, the money I save, a relaxed ease into the day. But this week? I can’t concentrate. I feel restless.  Every day I have to reassure my nan that if she takes the precautions necessary, she should be ok. And then I go back to my laptop and I stare down twitter with it’s 9 in 10 tweets about c-19. endless scrolling.

Tonight, whilst re-reading some texts for my PHD, i realized why I feel so uncomfortable being self-isolated.

It reminds me of being sick. And I am struck by the comparisons of the life people with chronic health conditions, disabilities and complex lives live every day.

I am not sick (not in the Corona way anyways) At the time of writing – i’ve been feeling the best i’ve felt in many many years recently. But I realize this lock-down, isolated life mirrors illness/injury in the same way that it affects our ability to be in the world.

Without real life interaction, even if it’s just me writing a bunch of bullshit on my laptop in Starbucks surrounded by strangers, it still feels like BEING in the world. I need some rhythm and rime, the beat of the street, i kinda need that Northern Rail community feeling to feel grounded. It gives my work the context it needs to feel tangible and real, otherwise — they’re just words on a page, drawings of things. Heidegger writes about this well in Being in Time. For him it makes no sense to abstract a paintbrush from the lifeworld of the human being in order to show that it’s mere an object made of molecules. The brush ceases to exist as brush if there is no human-being to use it.

 In other words, meaning and interpretation of our everyday ways of being in the world – underline and anker who we think we are and what we do.

Today we had a Skype with our newish Lab4Living Professor, Peter Llyod Jones, talking through his amazing catalog of varied work, underpinned by his scientific background but his understanding and need of combing art & design & all the other creative fields such as architecture and fashion to bring about the best most holistic and important/innovative works. He asked, “What does it mean to combine both science and art/design together and be a collaborator of both?”

The answer, of course, is simple: Science can in many ways explain *what* we are, but it cannot explain *who* we are and *why* we are.  We recognise beauty when we see it, we know when we feel pain and experience betrayal or joy. We don’t need technical explanations of these things in order to understand them or believe they exist.

The ubiquity of science’s usual calculative thinking can help give us a sense of freedom, and power of a ‘neutrality’ and it’s a sense of Truth. Presenting itself as the best, most sound, way of understanding ourselves and the world (it doesn’t).  So in theory, me being at home – hoping not to catch (or have previous caught & yet to get symptoms) c-19 – should give me a sense of agency in this. But bringing it back to that mirroring of chronic illness life, it does not.

When I was properly, pretty bed-bound sick – i learned fast what tending to the biological body does in medicine, it obscures what it means to *live* in that body, and what it *feels* like to be ill or injured, what it is like to experience the world differently – as ones embodiment shifts and changes.

As Jeffrey Bishop noted, Human life can not be reduced to mere functionality, without doing violence to the other features of being-in-the-world.  When you take away these contexts, or the ability to interact with it – it is a harm, a different kind of suffering.

We take for granted our interrelation of being-in-the-world, and when it beings to breakdown  – we feel like we’re falling out of our normal life. our of the world.

Whilst C-19 rages on, I made well aware of my “unstable body” – this self-isolation for longer, more necessity,  is just another sudden intrusion of the body into the everyday experiences. I’ve tried to explain in many different posts on this blog over the years about what it’s like to live in a body that keeps on changing? it can be frightening, sometimes even terrifying and always confusing. it generates this wild attention to your body that you never had before you was sick. One becomes a prisoner to any perceptible change — a cough, a lump, a pain. Predictability ends. You just grieve about the loss of it, allll of the time. Get forced to admit “new normals” when you just want the old normal.

C-19 is an equalizer in that it is forcing us to look and feel at our bodies and disruption of being in the world in the same way that illness & injury & other events do to others.

We have fallen out of the world, and most of  you have now joined me in what Susan sONTAG FAMOUSLY CALLED “THE Kingdom of the sick”.  But a lot of you aren’t sick.  you have to live a version of the sick kingdom life in order to either not kill other vulnerable people or not get sick yourself. Your way to project yourself into the world is disrupted.

And that’s what I am feeling. This wild uncomfortableness. Or kind of not belonging. An – what Heidegger called an “unhomelike being-in-the-world”. – the way we understand the world into which we know is thrown out.  Our world is no longer homelike, relatively stable. because illness (c-19 processeS) has disturbed our meaning making processes – it’s not just our body but the way in which we gain our being from/.

Having experienced serious illness – it leaves no part of your life untouched. Your relationships, your work, your sense of who you are and who you want to become, your future, your sense of life – and all these things change and it’s terrifying.

This creates a suffering.  The complex and profound suffering that is basic to the human condition – whether physical, mental, emotional, spiritual or otherwise – so something very few of us are willing to confront… fully.  It’s 1 of the reason why a lot of people have difficulty acknowledging friends are super sick, or people who are disabled continue to suffer great inequalities and injustices – because people can’t face their disruption because it means facing that it could also be them.  most of us would prefer not to dwell on the unpredictability of illness and death or the vulnerability of the human mind and body.

I feel like those who continue to keep going out, drinking in pubs having mass gatherings etc are turning away because they can’t deal with the idea of the suffering. They also don’t want to give up, momentarily, this ‘freedom’ that helps to give their world meaning and being. They also don’t want to experience what it’s like for so many people who are housebound due to social isolation, illness, and beyond.

And for me, here I am. In my bedroom. Not feeling real, not in the world. As noted many years ago, & multiple times on this blog – I have felt like I’m not going to make it to 35 (it was 30, but I got there). This feeling has been with me way before I got sick. Like with my poor background, it’s just a given. Now I am feeling it more than ever.  But with the long sickness, and now this – I have finally realized why the idea of dying without leaving a mark really bothers me. And why c-19 really frightens people.

When we can no longer project ourselves into our futures, we come face-to-face with ourselves – that our connection with the world is finite. What we’re really afraid of – is not so much the biological malfunctioning (tho that is scary) but the possibility of no longer to be able to *be* at all.

This kind of living takes away the privledges and luxuries of being to project secure and idealistic futures. It reveals the precariousness of our existences.

When I was so sick and couldn’t leave the house, it was fine because I had 0 energy. Now I’m finally getting my life back to a small part of what it was – and i’ve been thrown back into the life that sooooo many people have to live in, day-in & day-out. Without the imminent threat of C-19.

I see myself as an empathetic person, and i thought I had understood what it means to not be able to do stuff due to illness, to have your world broken and your place within questioned. But I finally think I get why it’s *so* dangerous for the elderly and the most vulnerable – who are relatively  bodily healthy – to be isolated and lonely from people, community, connection and activity. Because it breaks their being-in-the-world, it makes it difficult to ground yourself, and it feels very much unhomelikeness, within your own home.

I hope when we get to the end of this moment, that we will all reconsider how people are living and bring news way into helping connect people whose lives are already c-19 lockdown like.

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If you end up having to be isolated at home

Being sick – chronically – on and off in severity has made it that I too have had my fair share of endless isolation.  Some of it in an attempt to not catch anything from others, most of it because I had NO energy/too much pain to do anything, or to try and leave the house.

Having a day or 2 off from work seems at first a luxury. But when you know that you can’t really leave the house – it does start to feel – FOMO-y — starecrazy — what to do? What are you missing out on? As humans we are naturally supposed to socialize, be a community. Without others we begin to feel lost. Happiness only really exists when shared. That’s why loneliness is such a killer and a huge issue.

It’s probably the best time ever – in history – to be self-isolated.  You can do online shopping, have endless libraries of music, movies, shows, audio books, e-book, journal articles, random youtube videos & tiktoks. You can get your food delivered, do your HIIT work out in your living room, take up gardening if you are lucky enough to have a garden, learn how to draw or play the guitar by following online tutorials. You can finallllly get to the time to read those books that are piling up on the bedside cabinet.  and we can video chat to friends & family, or endless messages to one another if we so wish.

But with this comes great responsibility. Endless news streams on TV can become doom & gloom. Sending people who are already struggling into anxiety.  Many of us – who are on zero hr contracts, or causal contracts, or self employed will be worrying about money if we end up having to be isolated.   Many of us will have loved ones (or are in) a high risk catogery and we will be worrying about them, and the people on the frontline. We can sit down to watch a show – and waste a whole 45 mins deciding what we want to watch because in many ways – there is too much choice. or the illusion of such. sometimes we want to read but our brain feels too fuzzy to concentrate.

So this here is my crib-sheet to maximizing time – coming with good recommendations. a So you can maybe hoepfully be able to cut out some of the anxiety and indecision and begin to enjoy some of this extra time. The extra time gained from not being stuck in traffic, not being on an endless delayed northern rail train home, not being stuck in a meeting that never should have been a meeting.

I hope you’ll enjoy the Smizz fun/hopeful/uplifing/easy to engage with recommendations!

 

TV SHOWS

Parks & Rec – Amazon Prime/ NowTV / Sky –  A CLASSIC: People going out of their way to help each other. It doesn’t get any better than that.

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Sex Education (Netflix) – The second season builds on what made the first series so good. It’s confident, funny and surprisingly deep.

My Left Nut (BBC Three, iPlayer) – About a teenager who realises that he has an enlarged testicle. It morphs into a tender, heartfelt drama about grief and anxiety, and how your family will stick by you through the bad parts as much as the good.

Brooklyn Nine-nine (Netflix, 4OD, SKY) – NINE-NINEEE! you can re-watch, over and over any episode – but you will laugh and you’ll love every single character & the jokes never get old. What can I say, Michael Schur is an incredible empathetic comedy writer.

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The End of the F**king World (All4) – My friend Helen says she loved this show. So I gave it another chance, & realized its perfect for these times.

Midsommer Murders (ITV2, BritBox, ITV Hub) – My mom love to watch this show – not particularly because it’s good – but because it’s kind of ridiculous, which makes it funny ( see Martina mcutching get murdered by cheese in series 18) & it’s a really good game if you’re watching alongside others to figure out who the murder is – and even harder – what is their motive!

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The Bold Type  (amazon prime S1-3)- fans of The Devil Wears Prada-meets-Gossip Girl-meets Ugly Betty – will LOVE this. It’s hard not to love the characters. why do i love this show? its portrayal of the refreshingly supportive friendship of its three protagonists, as well as its frank look at complex contemporary issues like #MeToo, reproductive rights and of course all the drama that goes with being a twenty-something building a career and looking for love in New York City.

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Ugly Betty (S1-4) Amazon Prime – Of course, I can’t miss this off the list. I LOVED this show so much when it first came out in 2008 when things all felt uber hopeful. Betty will make you believe again. I watched this show, and saw my own struggle – how do you enter a highly elitest, competitive, expensive cultural field such as fashion (art) and keep your own values, sense of identity without doing your own heritage and diversity down. What does that elitism do to us culturally? A show so woke before its time – it could have been written yesterday & not nearly 10 years ago – and it’s wild to think these issues have barely been solved since. It’s high energy, bright clothes, lots of melodrama, best written characters and BIG DREAMZ OPTIMISIM DOING THE RIGHT THING energy-vibes are just what you need.

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Instant Hotel (Netflix) – I watched this when I was super sick as just something to fall asleep to. Before I knew it, i had blasted through 2 seasons. I wish I could get to see a 3rd season. Think 4 in a bed, meets changing rooms. IN a hot austrialian climate with people wanting to have the best airBnB basically,

The Great British Bake Off – (4OD, Netflix) – There’s never been such a more pure TV show. A competition but ultimately a group of people who love baking end up being awesome friends! Delicious food, super funny outcomes, great team work, bit of the best of britishness – Raising money for stand up to cancer episodes are sooo good & I think the New Years 2020 Derry Girls episode is the best in history.

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Derry Girls (S1+2 4OD, S1 Netflix) – Another wholesome amazingly written comedy. The specific setting gives Derry Girls its extra layer of complexity, as well as some of its funniest lines. By and large, life in all its unimaginable and bizarre glory goes on. The writing by creator Lisa McGee is top-notch, the show’s searing one-liners and tonally perfect ’90s soundtrack as fantastic as its predominantly female cast. The series maintains a reckless and irreverent tone and is never weighed down by politics or nostalgia. But it will take you back to growing up in the 90’s, early 00. And you’ll love every second of the show but it goes past way too fast.

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HOME – (s1+@ 4OD) – A comedy series written by and starring Rufus Jones deftly gets to the essence of home and family through Syrian asylum-seeker Sami. One of the issues with Brexit, and austerity etc is that we don’t really have touching cultural examples of it. It’s not really on TV or in the movies. But HOME does, and it does it so-so well. It has the potential to turn those Daily Mail readers into opening their homes to refugees.   This show shows the very worst and very best parts of living in the UK. It makes you route for everyone. And it’ll make you laugh and cry.

Please Like Me (Amazon Prime, netflix with a VPN) – Spend enough time around the show and it starts to grow on you in a mainstream 80s BBC sitcom kind of way. It’s a wry, down-to-Earth and often-moving account of how relationships with friends and family evolve as we grow into adulthood. Watch it for the real, difficult, compassionate Josh’s role as a young carer. Start it and stick with it.

Special (Netflix) – i freakin’ love this show. Masterful in 15 minutes bursts – which makes it one of those perfectly lengthed shows to watch before you go to sleep. aside from the show  is vastly significant in terms of what it does for representation in the mainstream culture, provides me, and other disabled and marginalized people, with a much-needed piece of representational belonging. It’s so loving and thoughtful, and ultimately it is not about accepting oneself. It is about showing oneself as you are.

Schitts Creek (Netflix, 4OD) – Maybe the most perfect comedy of our time? Every person in this show are the best.  As the series goes along, it’s less about class difference and more about a place where community welfare flourishes outside traditional systems of power.

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MOVIES

Love, Simon (Sky) 2018- At its heart, this is simply a story about love and tolerance and honesty, and told with a perfect dose of each of those things. You can watch it & it’ll remind you so much of growing up. What really makes this film a feat of queer cinema is how ordinary it is. It’s a love story between two men, but without tragedy and angst, seeming quite radical for how sweet it is. Dope soundtrack.

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I LOST MY BODY (Netflix) 2019 –  A disembodied hand tries to make its way back to its owner while a young man searches for connection after a traumatic event. It mixes brilliantly creative action and horror sequences with tender heartbreak and life-affirming drama. Go watch on Netflix!

THE REPORT (Amazon Prime) 2019- So, yeah, maybe I really love movies about people obsessed with the truth who fight institutions trying to hide it. Burns said the film is about our current “crisis of accountability” and it’s rare to come across a film that’s as involving as it is necessary. One for the times! It’s brilliantly engaging.
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Late Night (Amazon Prime, Sky, NowTV) 2019- Thompson and Kaling don’t even need to be acting here. Like all women, they’ve long had to navigate real-world misogyny. But they also know how to find the humor in it. An important movie that looks at the issues of sexism in comedy (& entertainment industry generally) but with a good laugh.

Booksmart (Amazon Prime) 2019 – An underrated awesome movie. Underrated because it’s about 2 strong girls. It’s more John Hughes than Judd Apatow, and it’s a little more Bridesmaids than Lady Bird. Booksmart is feminist, foul-mouthed and funny, turning the formulaic tropes of bawdy comedies inside out and giving us a couple of teen heroines who feel real and very 2019. It felt new from friends at the centre of the story to the celebration of female intelligence, ambition and loyalty.

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Finding Your Feet (Amazon Prime, Sky, NowTV, Netflix) 2018 –  I accidently watched this on the plane to the USA – when it told me it was a comedy. And it is. But it’ll also make you cry.  Watching it demands little effort. Evict your inner cynic and enjoying it should demand even less. It’s a bit sentimental, but I am *SO* there for it. The bright and funny first half examines issues affecting older people which are often ignored; The second is about making sure you don’t regret how you’ve spent your time.

Chef (Amazon Prime, Netflix) 2014 – an enjoyable and good-natured farce is a rarity in that (as its title tells us) it takes a chef as its central character and treats his profession with something approaching respect. The result is a small, unashamedly feel-good film that makes up for what it lacks in dramatic jeopardy with gentle comedy, heartwarming family scenes, ladles of food porn, and time spent among characters you like.

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Paddington (1&2) (Sky, NowTV & Amazon Prime) (2015 & 2018) – I’m not being ironic or weird or contrarian – but Paddington movies are some of the best movies of the past 10 years. It is simply (Pad 2), without hesitation, was my favourite film of 2018. It’s an eye-popping, laugh-out-loud, clockwork-constructed endorsement of kindness, forgiveness, and good ol’-fashioned human empathy. Or… ursine empathy.

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The Green Book (Amazon Prime, Sky) 2018 –  roast me for this, but I don’t care. A by-the-numbers studio movie and the numbers are great. The interplay between the two leads is a fantastic and familiar dance; every detail is exquisitely rendered.

ROMA (Netflix) 2018 – A bracingly human story set against abrupt, nearly-surrealist acts of God and society. The cataclysms only serve to underscore the fragility of the world and the strength of our personal bonds. Sad I never got to see it on the big screen myself.

 

PODCASTS

Alex Edelmen’s Peer Group – https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08smc1c – Alex is maybe one of the best comedians of our generation and he’s just getting started. This is such a great comedy podcast that looks at issues surrounding Millenials specifically, he does quite a bit from his current set on his current tour within some of the episodes, so worth a check out for that alone!

The News Quiz – https://www.bbc.co.uk/search?scope=sounds&filter=programmes&q=News%20Quiz&suggid=urn%3Abbc%3Aisite%3Acurated-m-o%3Anews-quiz  – every friday night – i look forward to catching up with comedy and news. takes the edge off. 

No Such Thing As A Fish –  https://www.nosuchthingasafish.com/
Could this be the best Podcast ever? Want some crazy facts to give people randomly but enjoy them in a bask of comedy discussion? This is for you. Plus there’s 300+ episodes to go through.

My dad wrote a porno – https://open.spotify.com/show/6nYCARKKZ5UvaUedL6KEu3 A series in which Jamie Morton reads out chapters from the erotic books his 60 year-old dad has written.

 

MUSIC

WORKIN’ FROM HOME PLAYLIST

Here’s my work from home playlist – it’s collaborative – so you can your own tunes to it. But the only rule is the song has to be your best/fav songs since 1990 onwards.

 

RUNNING PLAYLIST

If you’re going to go for a run. here’s my 10k inspired playlist that’s long enough to run a fast marathon

JAPAN VIBES

studio ghibli soundtrack amazingness to feel sad, happy, and relaxed all at the same time

 

THE RISING GIRLS CLUB

A playlist to help inspire all you females out there. You’re strong and you’ve got this

 

I’ll update this as I go along, but I hope this helps!

Remember- wash those hands often and super well. Stay safe and keep checking on neighbours and those who need extra help. And reach out if you feel everything is getting too much.

Happy SMIZZmas: my holiday message to you

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It’s the annual Smizz Christmas card!! I couldn’t decide which one to share, so I’m sharing them as a collection.

As we celebrate the holidays, and enter into a new year – let’s remind ourselves that love is trust, empathy, humanity, mutual aid, and care. A society built on such love is a strong society—probably the strongest of all possible societies.

I drew Doncaster and used it as my christmas card this year to raise some money for the floods. I was moved by the usual hardships my immediate community have had to endure – from effects of climate change & things beyond this – in particular, Tory cuts. BUT I saw my community come together. People opened up their homes for others, people came together and did art auctions – dedicating their time and work and labour. Volunteers ran emergency shelters & food for all. Members across Doncaster Council, Ed Miliband, Red Cross & beyond worked tirelessly and around the clock making sure people & their homes were ok. And that the rest of us could try & get back to normality too – like roads being cleared from flood water and beyond. So I also ran 10k & sold some prints of these drawings (minus the snow added) – you can still get one! (A4 & A3)

For the rest of the season, I will be donating to Crisis to help fund accommodation for people who are homeless this winter season. Did you know that in Doncaster we have the highest rate of homelessness in the whole of Yorkshire? (This is because of Tory cuts & changes to benefit systems & them cutting all local councils money by around 40% before councils have to sell local assets such as football pitches to get some more funding)

I am also donating to Open Arms, which is a non-governmental organization whose save all the people who are mighty desperate to try & reach Europe by fleeing horrible conditions of war, persecution or poverty.

We (the people in the UK) often fetishise the means of making people’s lives good and fulfilling, while ignoring the fundamental entitlement to those good and fulfilling lives. Like, we talk about train fares and renationalisation, not how amazing it would be to travel cheaply and efficiently.

We talk mostly about what people should settle for, not what they have every right to expect. One reason the UK has drifted heavily into inequality is cuz we have accepted the idea that having a decent life is provisional. And it truly is not. And this is something i am focusing on this holiday season. Making people feel seen and heard.

As y’all know, I am a bit extra when it comes to the festive season. And it stems from the winter of 2012, when I was really, really sick.

All of the money I earnt from my job at waterstones that festive season, in between hospital appointments, literally went on buying people gifts – like I wanted that Christmas to *really* count because I wasn’t sure if I was going to have many more. These were literally my thoughts.

It was when I realized that I took a lot of things in my life for granted, and getting to enjoy and be with friends and family over the holiday periods was one of them. I felt a bit ashamed of this taking and not giving that I had done so much in my life, and not acknowledging the things in my life to be grateful for. After all, we were extremely lucky considering.

In this new light, I reverted back to my younger Christmas excitement. Keen to make that Christmas an awesome one – and i continue this legacy on. i NEVER want to take any of my privledges — this life for granted. And I don’t want to witness the suffering – a lot which is unnecessary due to a lot of gov policy & culturally – without trying to help.

I love how the narratives surrounding christmas – in our movies & shows & music – are about second chances, redemption, hope, a time to make up for a time you wasn’t very nice. And it’s the reason why I get so excited for Christmas! It’s a time where people try to be better versions of themselves – even if it’s just for the holidays – and they try to right their wrongs, and they think of others more than we usually do normally. And suddenly we make more effort to go out together, and all of these things added together really makes a dull season do-able. It brightens up a bad year or makes the year ahead seem less daunting.

And just like watching these endless xmas movies that my mom and I do every year now, it’s not ever about the gifts at all, but about spending time or getting in touch with those who matter. About sharing if you have enough.

The false scarcity is this: we believe that shutting out others, keeping them out of our orbit, our country, our competitive space—that this somehow makes things more easier for us.

But today, value isn’t created by filling a slot, it’s created by connection. By the combinations created by people. By the magic that comes from diversity of opinion, background and motivation. Connection leads to ideas, to solutions, to breakthroughs.

The false scarcity stated as, “I don’t have enough, you can’t have any,” is more truthfully, “together, we can create something better.”

And going forwards in setting the tone to my next decade is just that. To help, share, collaborate and support. To be compassionate and empathetic. To taking chances, and allowing second chances. Believing in our potential – not what people *think* we are capable of. I will do whatever it takes.

I just like to take this moment to say thank you to everyone in my life who have gotten me here too (from everything). I love y’all! Keep being awesome!

Happy SMIZZmas friends, whatever holiday you celebrate – and where ever you are. You’ve made this year incredible and I am moved by all of your generosity of kindness & spirit & support.

Lots of love, your friend – SMIZZ x

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3,500 miles, 14 states, 2 provinces, lessons learnt: We are not built to do big things alone, we are built to do them together

Today’s been my last full day in NYC, and in America. And I’m a bit sad about it.

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This nearly month trip has been a blast and an inspiration. It’s been a frank reminder that our time is too valuable to let a moment go to waste. We need steal as much life as we can out of each day. And I certainly feel like we have done this every single day for 28 days.

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This is mainly due to my ride-or-die-hommie – Colleen – the driver, who drove over 3,5000 miles around north America (Thanks so much Colleen!). Think driving miss daisy meets velema and louise. we visited 14 USA states and 2 provinces in Canada! I visited 6 whole new places/cities – making my knowledge of certain states that I had already ticked off before – even better! With Pittsburg being one of my favourite new cities to have visited. Must be that steel connection. I love understated, post industrial, arty cities *cough*-sheffield-*cough*

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We drove through the most glorious sunsets, that hung around for an hour in all their pinky, orange and purple gloriness. In the end it was like we were actually chasing the sunsets. The more south and west we went, the longer they hung around, felt like you could touch them and looked like paintings in photos.

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We hardly arrived anywhere on time between each destination, (thanks google maps when we were planning for the lies!) but it just goes to show that it’s the journey that matters, and it was never about the destination anyways (especially given that our destination would be back where we had started). In the wrong turns and google suggested adventures, we discovered uncharted areas, and ghost towns of rich-pasts, farm lands, mountains, kangaroo, gems, moon-views, world wonders, the brightest stars and the clearest skies! endless waffle houses and many a gas-station toilet.

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We saw dinosaurs, ate at 120 year old functioning ice-cream parlours, farms of various sizes including the massive production of milk for the North of the USA. We chased waterfalls, and slept in places that felt like we could be in a horror movie — or places that only a protagonist would be staying in to run away from something in their past. (this was emily’s house BTW – deep in a rainforest in Georgia — she said we wouldn’t find it – and boy-was she right!)

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We got some incredible emily warning ceramics, and colleen booked an AirBnB that looked like it was decorated in 1920’s (& i swear down it could have been haunted, i had to sleep with the light on- C still thinks i’m being dramatic about it- but those who saw my insta-story will know the truth).

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I learnt that Colleen sleep walks and talks (don’t worry, she mostly did this in motels/hotels). We nearly picked up a hitchhiker (he invited himself along and we had to politely decline saying the car was too full of pottery for him to have a seat & we were heading to dinasour world next) He quickly disappeared once he thought that *we* were the weirdos. And I also learnt that Colleen is very opinionated about things including road-side eateries. I want her to start a podcast or youtube channel where people just give her a subject and she’ll rift about how scandal-less or waste of time/money it is, or how amazing it is.

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I learn about a dude called Mr Rodgers and how to be kind to ourselves and others through his teachings (& colleen’s pure love for him). and all things from Pittsburgh.

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My french is still LA-TERRIBLE, c’est very bad. (the only time i sound proper yorkshire is when i speak another language). I was constipated for 3/4 of the whole time here (HA). And i ripped my stitches out of my mouth by accident eating SI Broccli! HA!

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Time Zones confused us often. Did you know Tennessee & Kentucky & Chicago is central zone but parts of Indiana and Ohio is not?! very confusing. Tax across the USA is wild. Chicago was the most expensive. We’ve tried lots of foods, from 10am ice-cream in Columbus, Ohio, to mexican breakfasts in Chicago, to Wah Wah gas station food, the biggest slices of pizza in philly (& the worst greek salad haha), to sweet potato pancakes in the south, chicken & waffles, pirogies of all types, hot dogs, my fav tacos and “water and leaf” soups, oatmeal shakes, piles and piles of freshly prepared dumplings, my fav Chinese- PHU-GEES in NH and beyond. I keep ordering far too much food and don’t learn.

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My Sandy Island adventures got me chasing sunrises, i drank too much and kept Lea up chatting absolute bollocks. It made me fully miss sandy summers. I got to see my crew from over the years including Dave B, and Kate, and Julia. Vanda and I reminisced about our Sydney adventures. and Dani and the crew and I went Northern Lights hunting! It feels so weird and good to have a base there. A place that feels like a home. Like a good Smizz Horcrux. I feel like bits of my soul is in NYC and sandy Island. Who knew New Hampshire would ever be a smizz place?

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I’ve spent a good month being glad for life, surrounded by people who I love, doing what I love, & meeting more new super awesome people. I’ve been shown many true and generous acts of kindness this year – here in the USA and back at home. And I’m completely humbled and for ever grateful for these. Thanks just doesn’t seem to come even close to how i want to say Thank you! to EVERYONE!

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one morning this summer before my trip here – with my mouth in stitches, and appointment sheets for the next abdominal surgery, I burst into tears over breakfast, convinced that this illness had drained me of my creative & living/Smizz abilities. Even in that dark moment, though, I knew that my co-workers & friends wouldn’t let me fail. And it isn’t just picking up the baton when I drop it; they’ve (you’ve) motivated and encouraged me through periods of lucidity to art/live the best I could. I’m so damn lucky.

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I feel that I have a little more understanding of what it means to fall over and feel that you have to get up, no matter what you have to leave behind in the process. This is an easy realization to come to because I’m pretty lucky that I have you -all- the amazing people in my life, who have supported me & helped me to live. Whatever i’ve lost, you make it feel like i’m nearly whole. All I have is that you should appreciate what you’ve got.

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I tend to do these trips when I’m sort of running away from what’s been happening to me. It hurts. But I’ve thought long & hard about what I want out of life. And i want to be here for at least another 5 years.

Today I got to see Alex 1 last time, and the way he talks about leadership & connecting always inspires me and i feel it in the pitt of my stomach. (i can’t wait for his future book). As he says, doctors check for pulses but he checks his people. And that’s what i love about him, and something i’m trying to aim for too. My USA trips are always inspiring me to be better, to commit to my work, to give back to my community. I have some time, and if I use it well. It will be more than enough.

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through all this stuff, I feel like I’ve grown up a second time. I’m broken; But I am alive. I’m coming home to  fix some more gnarly health stuff, but i’m re-charged to finish my PHD, start my new work contracts using arts based research methods in public health and doing research into social detriments and getting rid of these health inequalities as much as we can through ensuring access is made for the people who need these services. and restructing injustice things within policy and beyond. I’m looking forward to really starting to lay the bones down for “REAL “- a business adventure with Helen doing social-justice through creative practice. and lots of stuff in between.

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i’m constantly looking forward to sunsets and bike rides and tacos and getting dirt on my boots and feeling grass between my toes and feeling the calm breeze sweep my face as i drive with the windows down. these are the small, forgettable pieces of life that i think contain all the magic, all the billion little tiny disco ball reflections and retractions of the love and light in this world.

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This life is teaching me that there are golden moments, and the darkness cannot touch them. I’m learning the art of discovering those moments, the ones hiding in hard moments and challenging days. but man.. is it worth it.

Wish me luck! and see y’all later!

What My Teeth Are Teaching Me About My Past & Politics

It’s been a while since I’ve blogged. And certainly, this blog will seem a bit more “off brand” than normal – because it’s about my Teeth.  Have I ever written about my teeth like this before? No, no I haven’t.

In fact, until around 9 months ago, I just didn’t even think about my teeth at all.

Here is a fun fact about me:  I am kind-of scared of the dentist. I know dentists are cool, great & amazingly smart and skilled people – but the environment & process of dental care FREAKS ME OUT.

I don’t know where this fear has come from. I think I learned it from my mom, who also hates going to the dentist and is probably worse than me at attending.  Until this year, my nan had to make all my dental appointments & take me because she knew I wouldn’t have done so myself.  Both my mom and I probably wouldn’t even be still registered with a dentist if it wasn’t for my nan. (Praise the nan!) And let me tell y’all, it’s HARD to get on a good NHS dentist list these days.

This is all interesting because whilst I’ve always known to brush my teeth 2 times a day, and “look after them” & reduce my acidic & sugar intakes and likes – I’ve just never appreciated the importance of what my oral health, care & history means on my general overall health.

Because I’ve grown up in a very precarious life – issues of not sure if money/food would make it to the end of the week, crappy food at school, things like stress from domestic violence & homelessness makes it so you don’t really pay attention to something that is just a given.  Because I’m genetically really lucky with my teeth (I had to have something good in these genes!), my teeth are all kinda naturally straight and normal looking. I’ve not even had any wisdom teeth yet. As such, because they’ve just been chill – i took them for granted whilst the super invasive stuff of my life took over.

I quickly learned from around age 13 that Coca-Cola was a great thing for energy. A natural night owl left me sleep-deprived, alongside having to be semi-aware for aggressive behaviour in the house.  It was cheaper than the food that would get me that same energy, so I could save my dinner money for other things I needed instead, or if there was no dinner money.  It was caffeinated & kept me full for quite a long time.  And so the semi-addiction to Coca-cola happened, and so did the true start of my poor teeth health.

My dentist at the time just never really communicated to/with me. He knew I wasn’t a fan of going to him and he could see what I was doing with my teeth – but never really broached the subject. Until I was around 18 when he told me that now I was an adult he could tell me that I was brushing away all the enamel from my teeth after consuming sugary drinks, so I should wait at least 2-3 hours before brushing. Why didn’t he tell me this literally 4 years earlier now that I had a mouth full of fillings?   So many questions & potential answers.

It was around the age of 17 that I started to feel a deep shame about my teeth. But it wasn’t strong enough yet & I didn’t understand it enough to pay too much attention to this feeling about it every time i brushed my teeth.

I started doing that, the waiting to brush my teeth, rather than giving up the Cola. Now I was a university student with no money either. Which was fine. My upbringing had prepared me for this lifestyle. Needs for new fillings became less with this new info of waiting to brush my teeth, but the dentist would opt for replacing old fillings if he couldn’t find new cavities.   But now the shame of all of this had really started to seep in.

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Occasionally, somehow, people’s teeth would come up at uni. “I’ve never had a filling!” many people would joyfully announce. Some people would say, with shame, how they had to have 1 or 2 fillings, but they only happened when they were younger! Never now!

 

I’d just pretend I hadn’t heard the convo quite often. For me, my teeth were half mental. Luckily all of the fillings were on my molars and pre-molars. But there was a shame I couldn’t explain about my oral health.  It was a bit like smoking, I guess. You know it’s bad for you – but you do it anyways. I felt that if I was brushing my teeth – and coca-cola helped me get through some super tough times with lack of money and energy / good food then it should have been fine. I mean, it was just a drink & I was doing what I was told with brushing. But what I hadn’t clocked around about now, was that my uni friends didn’t have any cavities or many, and were ultra proud of this status because they had much more secure home life & came from more money than me.  It was that middle class, affluent bubble again, that comes in many disguises. Still, I knew that I was responsible – ultimately – for my teeth. Poor background or not.

Over the past years, I have dramatically lowered my consumption of full-sugar drinks like Coke. I do a lot of a ZERO & MAX low calorie no sugar drinks now.  But they’re still carbonated & acidic.

 

The last time before this year that I went to the dentist was in 2016 after I had finished Radiotherapy. One of my back teeth had cracked (from a stress clenching that my dentist never told me i was doing ). I was eating some chocolate after my last case-discussion & a whole massive chip came off my tooth and  i was due to go to USA for the summer. No way did I want potential toothache in USA so I went to the dentist where he proceeded to fix my tooth & gave me more fillings/replaced them.

It was around April 2018 – and that same filling from 2016 fell out. I told myself I’d go to the dentist as soon as I had saved up the money.  I had saved up the money but I was still refusing in my mind to get it fixed.  It didn’t hurt or anything, just annoying when food would get stuck. I kept telling myself, I just don’t have the time. I was very reluctant to pay to feel super bad at the dentist from shame and fear. I left it, whilst I kept telling myself I’d do it soon.

In November last year, I got really sick. I was running 40+ C temp, but no one could figure out what the infection was.   I went to Budapest a few weeks later for my friends birthday weekend, whilst on long-course antibiotics. We were out in a ruin bar, and it was so cold it started to snow. I was drinking a Coke (i still felt gross so alcohol wasn’t for me).  It was there where I got the worlds worst ear ache/face pain. It was proper NEURALGIA. induced by me messing around my TMJ & the cold. The panic overcame me when i thought it could be my teeth. i sat there outside checking my teeth like a crazy person but they didn’t hurt. the gums looked fine. No signs or redness of abscesses. But the pain was INTENSE.

I let that face pain go on until Jan 2019 where it was getting more and more frequent and intense.

I made my 1st ever dentist appointment (remember that my nan had done them all until now) & it had been so long since I had been that my old dentist had retired.

in the meantime between the new appointment, I started googling potential causes of the pain & convinced myself that I had gum disease. It matched everything I had subconsciously told myself about my worth & my habits. I even got my affulent PHD mates to show me their gums – and even though I’m not dentist, i knew their oral health was better than mine.

I went to my appointment & I said to the new dentist that I was nervous (he was like “why it’s just a check-up?” & I was like *I know* but still dunno). I said I had the insane FACE pain, but none of my teeth hurt. I had convinced it was an upper wisdom tooth coming through, not anything to do with the lower filling-less molar as the pain wasn’t no where near my lower jaw. He checked it all out & told me it wasn’t the wisdom tooth  but he might need to remove the fillingless tooth if  he couldn’t fix it.

(I’m leaving out the part where he questioned my dental history accuracy due to the previous dentist filling out my dental record inaccurately?! And made out that I had done dental elsewhere – what a trust exercise!?) 

 

A potential tooth removed.  I ask if it would hurt, he said the no-dental procedure should hurt. LOL LOL LOL. He said I would need a long appointment. I booked it & paid, relieved that I didn’t have gum disease.

On the day of the filling, he told me he couldn’t do it as the tooth was “far too gone”. He said he could take it out now. He couldn’t even do root canal because something had grown? I asked him if i had caused for it to get like this because i had waited so long.  He was a nice dentist though and said it wasn’t my fault. Instantly trying to help me unshame myself.

 

(i do think it was because I did leave it too long, but it was nice of him to not blame me).   OK i thought, I’m sure i can let him remove this tooth, RIGHT NOW. He was really good. He explained everything, and talked me through it all. I never knew until now that I actually had a choice in dental treatment. my previous dentist would just *do it* No real discussion.

There’s a funny story in this tooth removal process – like the fact that I had gone to this appointment on my bike- apparently you can’t ride a bike after surgery? who knew! and i wanted to go straight to work- to lecture. but i actually couldn’t talk. good times.

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But a root got left behind. The dentist let me keep my tooth. I don’t know why i said yes like a weirdo – but I guess I thought that since I had paid £60, i might as well keep it as a reminder.  He made me come back to him for 2 follow up appointments, which i thought was very good.

 

In the meantime, I started researching tooth stuff. And I became shook about the link between social inequality and ACES and oral health & loss of teeth.

Current dental research focuses on health conditions such as diabetes and lung disease that can be risk factors for oral health.

Haena Lee, a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, assessed the impact of adverse childhood events on oral health—specifically, total tooth loss—later in life. These events included childhood trauma, abuse, and, to a lesser extent, smoking.

“The significant effects of these adverse experiences during childhood on oral health are persistent over and above diabetes and lung disease, which are known to be correlates of poor oral health,” Lee says.

Lee drew data from the 2012 Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal study of older adults and their spouses in the United States. The study includes a core survey collected every two years and a supplemental survey every off year. In 2015, the supplemental survey asked detailed information about childhood family history.

Lee derived the participants’ oral health information from the 2012 HRS core survey and their childhood experiences, adult educational attainment, and poverty status from previous HRS surveys and the 2015 supplemental survey.

Using this data, she investigated three models of life course research: the sensitive period, defined as the time in a person’s life during which events have the most impact on his or her development; the accumulation model, which examines the effect of the accumulation of events over the life course; and the social mobility model, which examines the change in a person’s socioeconomic status during that person’s life.

Conclusion? Failing oral health in older adults, especially total tooth loss, may have its roots in adverse experiences such as childhood trauma, abuse, and low educational attainment. Findings also suggest that oral health in later life may be more influenced by accumulation of adversity rather than changes in social and economic position over the life course.

Read more about this incredible (american) study here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/cdoe.12463

 

After i had that tooth out & did this research – and saw why i felt shame for my teeth. They’re a sign of all the shit I’ve had to endure- abuse, homelessness, poverty, massive amount of stress and chronic illness. – it’s a record dug deep into my bones, and my shorted DNA now – that makes it look like I’m thick or that just don’t give a shit. And that my dentist of 15 years just didn’t really care about to ask or tell me stuff.

The trauma I’ve endured means I *REALLY* don’t like people looking in any of my holes where I have little control or can’t see. So that’s probably why I’m bad at smear uptakes too.  So it’ has helped to tell the new dentist I DO NOT LIKE this. And he explains everything now. (I also told my dr I wasn’t a fan of smears & she made them better too)

AFter the tooth out, I have become a bit obsessed about trying to look after my teeth better than I have ever done in the past. Plus, I have a bit of money that i can spend on this stuff now – where as 2 years ago I couldn’t even buy a general food shop. 

(i’m still drinking carbonated drinks – ooooops) But I bought my first ever supersonic toothbrush. WOW. Here’s another reason why poor people tend not to have brushed their teeth correctly – electric toothbrushes are INSANE & you can feel the difference.  And my teeth LOOK whiter!!! FOR REALS.  Now of course, we know that electric toothbrushes are obvs a defining difference between folks with flexible incomes and the poor (for those of us on a megabudget but enough to buy a new electric toothbrush – this is an amazing tooth brush for £21 https://www.amazon.co.uk/Electric-Toothbrush-Fairywill-Charged-Rechargeable/dp/B07M9ML7XP/ref=sr_1_3_sspa?keywords=sonic+toothbrush&qid=1563721336&s=gateway&sr=8-3-spons&psc=1 )

But this toothbrush came with instructions of how to brush my teeth & it’s timed. I thought I was brushing my teeth for 2 mins. Turns out I really wasn’t. And I didn’t know of the correct technique? 

I started really routinely flossing my teeth, but I had to watch youtube videos to help me learn how to do it properly?! Turns out I only know how to floss from TV & movies – and they just slosh some thread between your teeth. Which is alright – but it’s not the good/correct way to floss!? WHO KNEW? Why has this never been shown to me before? Apparently, you’re supposed to almost wrap the floss around each side of your teeth. Makes sense now I think about it!  I found Dental Hygiene with Whitney (Teeth Tooth Girl) – who is pretty amazing. She makes dental health look cool, fun and easy. Here’s a video of atalk through a dental cleaning (in USA): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTiC467dwUM&list=FL3F7cPjI9Wp7P1uf9RTl8JQ&index=9&t=0s 

It’s wild to think I’m having to find how to do  this stuff ONLINE – MANY years later.

This mouthwash is gross but it really makes your gums amazing: https://www.corsodyl.co.uk/products/corsodyl/mouthwash/ And now I can eat ice-cream by biting into it!? I’ve not ever been able to do this for as long as I can remember without it hurting.

I usually chase it with it’s nicer tasting mouthwash: https://www.corsodyl.co.uk/products/mouthwash/ (fresh mint)

Though I’ve been using this recently as it was on offer and it’s like setting your moth ALIGHT lol. https://www.listerine.co.uk/products/fresh-breath/listerine-total-care wicked fresh breath though.

My dentist helpfully showed me this lil baby cute tooth to help brush hard to reach areas too : https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wisdom-Interspace-Super-Slim/dp/B01NB08GMX/ref=asc_df_B01NB08GMX/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=310836173466&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=11693902512502109974&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9046280&hvtargid=aud-545671390501:pla-563452080186&psc=1

This past week, I got to see a MAXFAX doctor for the root of my tooth. And what i found out is another blog post for anyone struggling with facepain, TMJ, ear ache & chronic headaches. So come back for that.

BUT why did I write this post?

In my research I learned that Kids, after virus’ in the UK, the 2nd highest reason for hospital admission is due to tooth decay.  I’ve just had to find out how to properly look after my teeth, like technique, materials, length, etc – myself because no one was able to actively show me when i was growing up. Not even my dentist.

I’m working in Public Health & lots of my contracts tend to be about healthy active lifestyles – and yet i’ve come across very little in my research and events that I attend about this HUGE lack of compassionate & fun dental public health care. When i looked into the funding of it, it’s basically VERY VERY small. This isn’t fair & it isn’t right.

I feel ashamed about my oral health and there’s so many people out there like me. But i just wanted to say – don’t feel bad about it. It’s happened now,  I can’t help all the shit situations I have been in. But it doesn’t mean everything else around us has to pretend our painful lives don’t exist. lets get better going forwards. Lets take the stigma out of this stuff, because we’re not doing a very good job in the first place in ensuring people have the right knowledge to begin with, they can’t access to some of the better tools to help do it well and dental practices & research needs to be better at assessing a more holistic approach as to why people are doing things which might be bad for them, and help them with it. Rather than pretending it’s not there or the person just doesn’t care.

If you got to the bottom  of this post, you probably needed to hear this too.

Let’s change make dental public health higher up on the agenda

 

 

 

Shame, Gratitude, (health) Care & Resilience: Working in Art & in Research

Shame. It’s a shameful thing.  To feel ashamed. It makes you feels weak. It feels like you’re kind of worthless. The other day, my GP shamed me. He told me that I just “need to suck it up & live with it”. (it being bad-ass headaches/migraines/face/shoulder pain) I’m not sure he meant to, but he did. I wasn’t even there for that. He tried to quickly move on – but it hung in the air & it is now burnt into my mind ever since. I keep replaying the moment inside my head of all the things I *wished* I had said in response to him. To call him out. But I stumbled over my words and I itched my head as I usually do when I feel socially inept and at a loss of words as all of the emotion came over me at once.

This moment, which I had gone for antibiotics for a chest infection (which i got!),  all came down to him reading some clinic notes that the physio had written. She had said that I take (over the counter) codeine about twice a month  for a 5-year chronic headache & INTENSE neck/face pain, but only when its pain scale 8+ & it’s grinding me down. And it’s true.   The neurologist prescribed me stuff for it 3 years ago – but the GP refused to keep on prescribing it. we tailored the drugs off – and now I just live in pain. I get it. I understand why he doesn’t want me on these drugs. It’s chronic pain, it’s probs a bit psychosomatic – but i do have shit wrong with me that would actually give me chronic headaches like hypercalcemia that gets so high sometimes I have to be hospitalized.  And also like, migraines are a real thing! But he doesn’t see that. And again, I do  it get the “no drugs thing”. That’s why I have adapted my own coping systems. I know stress makes it worse, Physio helps my neck & shoulder & gives me really good relief for a decent amount of time, and I know I need to sleep-in at weekends to give my body *Something* to building itself back up. I know the GP won’t give me shit for it – so I take the odd over the counter pain relief? So what!?  If he wants control over the stuff I am taking – then he should offer the support. But he doesn’t – so, I guess that’s structural iatrogenesis for you.

I have to take the pain relief when the pain grinds me down so much that I feel COMPLETELY worthless – like the pain makes all my left side of face feel numb and sometimes I can’t actually get language out. It’s embarrassing. My job is about communication – and sometimes i just can’t communicate properly with people cuz the headache/face numbness is so bad i loose my ability to grasp the correct word – or know how to spell it? It’s a weird sensation. It’s like having the worlds slowest seizure. But it goes on FOR DAYS. WEEKS. Even months if it’s SUPER bad like it was back in the radiotherapy training days.  It literally makes me feel like I want to kill myself – because anything is better than not feeling like you’re alive. I joke about this with friends at work. They laugh but pull me up on it. “You’re not serious though, are you?” they say. I just laugh and & say “i don’t know” because honestly on those days, i just – don’t know.  We get back to typing on our laptops and pretend we’ve not really exchanged this odd truth because it doesn’t sit well with who i am.  When the pain is manageable – i’m like the chillest, generally happiest person you’ve met that day.

The GP – a dude who I really respect & admire – made me feel like *proper* shit by shaming me like that (again esp when I didn’t bring it up!). I carry the shame around with me all the time. It weighs me down, and the dirty secret of mine.  I don’t need to hear to suck it up from someone who is supposed to at least be pretending to help.  So I was like, what’s even the point, right?  And It’s not the 1st time he’s shamed me. I can’t blame him directly tho. Healthcare is historically built upon shaming women (Especially) .

I’ve been making my medical shames into comics (this 1 isn’t finished yet). Maybe one day, i’ll give them to my GP.

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So what’s this shame gotta do with everything else? Well, this is the thing. I know that shame is the opposite of art.

When you live inside of your shame, everything you see is inadequate and embarrassing. The pain you can’t seem to get rid of.  A lifetime of traveling and having adventures and not being tethered to long-term commitments looks empty and pathetic and foolish, through the lens of shame. You haven’t found a partner. Your face is aging. Your body will only grow weaker. Your mind is less elastic. Your time is running out. Shame turns every emotion into the manifestation of some personality flaw, every casual choice into a giant mistake, every small blunder into a moral failure. Shame means that you’re damned and you’ve accomplished nothing and it’s all downhill from here.

Working in art and academia/research kind of makes it super easy to fall into shame. The way these worlds work – defaultly – can make you feel pretty inadequate at times. I mean, anyone who has received the raft of reviewer #2 will know what I mean.

Shame creates these imaginary worlds inside our heads. This haunted house that I have created is forged from my shame. No one else can see it, I keep trying to describe it to them. I find ways to say, “You don’t want any part of this mess. I’m mediocre, stupid/boring, and poor. Do yourself a favour and leave me behind.” Sometimes I think it’s because I want to be left behind, though. That way, no one bears witness to what I’ve become.

I’ve gotten super lucky recently though when it has come to work, somehow. I’ve been blessed with an incredible opportunity to do a commission for Yorkshire Visual Arts Network (YVAN) – on creating a work based on snapshots of working in Yorkshire and Humberside as an artist.   And I decided I’d look at this iffy word Resilience.  It absolutely does my head-in, does that word.  It’s a new buzzword. And it gets banged around in scenarios where people are in really stressful situations: an overstretched NHS, an underfunded school, understaffed university, a over-stretched and increasing demand public sector. The reasons why people are stressed & burnt out & things are taking longer *isn’t* the underfunding – no – people just need to be *more* resilent. Here this is the placing the structural injustices onto individuals – and it turn it shames them too.

The North, traditionally and currently, gets less funding than the south. But – it’s cool because WE ARE RESILIENT.

Over the past few weeks I have been digging down deep across various areas: Sheffield, Doncaster – soon Hull and Withernsea. A bit of Huddersfield. I’ve been taking documentation, talking to people. About labour, about art, about making, about worth/value/time.

But I am left more inspired than I first thought I would be.  Every single conversation has ended up about being and providing some sort of care. I am refreshed. This wasn’t what I was expecting to find. I had chosen these specific people because I knew they were doing something special, and was responding to these structures that build shame around us all. They are responding with a resilence built around care.

Over the past few decades the individual, the self, has been at the center. But I’m finding people who are leading us toward a culture that puts relationships at the center. They ask us to measure our lives by the quality of our attachments, to see that life is a qualitative endeavor, not a quantitative one. They ask us to see others at their full depths, and not just as a stereotype, and to have the courage to lead with vulnerability. These  people are leading us into a new culture. Culture change happens when a small group of people find a better way to live and the rest of us should copy them.

I am excited to share this new body of work (still in the process of being made) with you – but the website will be shared with y’all soon.

All of this has made me see that we all need to discard some of this shame that we’re carrying around all the time. But even if we can’t cast off all our shame that quickly, through the lens of art, shame can become valuable.

When you’re curious about your shame instead of afraid of it, you can see the true texture of the day and the richness of the moment, with all of its flaws. You can run your hands along your own self-defeating edges until you get a splinter, and you can pull the splinter out and stare at it and consider it. When you face your shame with an open heart, you’re on a path to art, on a path to finding joy and misery and fear and hope in the folds of your day.

Instead of thinking what needs fixing? we need to be here instead. We can build a new kind of existence, one that feels small and flawed and honest, but each day we can accumulate a kind of treasure that doesn’t disappear.  A reminder that you are alive. And you’re worthy and valued and seen. Chronic pain, citations, published journal articles, bad reviews and all.

Where wonder reigns and hope exists

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Where wonder reigns and hope exists…

Every day I woke up on the train with a desire to feel the Sun. Instead, the day offered gray sky with hints of a snowstorm. The peaks of mountains were hidden, the distance made blurry by snow blowing hard outside but I felt irresistibly drawn to its other glories: the purity of the wind, the promise of imminent thunder, the morning whisper of birds. Fields of Canadian Goose. I never knew why the Canadian goose was a thing, now I know that there’s 1000s out there. Flying together in frigid weather.

As we made our way through the long curvy rail-roads of the North of Ontario into the Prairies of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, the scenery reminded me of Alaska as seen on movies like Into The Wild (spoiler, Alaska is one of the 7 states that I’m missing off my 50 visited states list). Eminent mountains, frozen lakes, endless fields and many sightings of wild animals. Out here, I didn’t take many photos. I was content to simply be in the presence of this majestic landscape, treating those moments with the weightiness and value they deserve.

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In every sight, wonder. In every step, curiosity. In every feeling, awe.

Imagine a scene — you’re standing next to thousands of migrating birds in a snowstorm with endless fields as a backdrop. Swans flutter in the distance like rising snowflakes. You feel part of something big, something that you’ve seen only in National Geographic.

What would you do if you find yourself in a moment like that? It takes time to sink in. We need to listen to what these moments are telling us. Standing in the snowstorm, I experienced nature’s intense power, while at the same time, I am reminded of its sublime beauty.

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It made me think about hope, about what hope is and what it is not.

Over the past few years, chronic illness/pain has grinded  me down just enough to feel on the true brink of hopelessness, a good few times. I never really understood hopelessness, until I was there. Where you’d take being dead for being alive, at any moment, because being alive like that doesn’t even feel like being alive. It’s worse than being alive because you’re suffering.  suffering in ways that are difficult to articulate.  It’s like being stuck in between being alive and dead.  A place of purgatory. But the thing about purgatory is that whilst you feel an emptiness. You don’t realize what a dark place you’re in until you get out and you can see again. Change happens. But it can happen literally overnight. Like it did for me. Even though we’re taught change usually comes over time.

Today the train ran 5.5 hours late. I’m not sure how, but I think it’s something to do with freight trains. This meant that we had a knock on effect on how little time we had in other stops. We had a quick stop with surprise wifi in Edmonton. It was just enough time and wifi to quickly post photos i had accumulated on instagram, and a brief update for Facebook and Twitter so my mom knew I was still alive.

As I write on Facebook, a FB memory appears that stops me in my tracks. It really brings it all back. A few years ago today, I was leaving JFK airport after a YOLO road trip. It was the end of summer after gaining a life-changing diagnosis, which i had spent mostly running away from. I still remember this moment with crystal clear precision, what I was wearing, the smells, the reactions. I can play back most of that summer memories like as if on tape. I left the USA thinking I might not ever make it back. I cried. I felt sorry for myself. I didn’t believe it was true.

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But friends banded together across Sandy Island, then the country… and then across the globe! sometimes I was throwing up too much or too weak to talk. But we kept going. Friends donated time, money, connections. Strangers sent mail, hundreds of photos. All in the hope to save my life or at least make me more comfortable and show support.

I told myself that if I ever get through this, that stuff would be different. There was still so much I still needed to see, so much time wasted, so much to do such as i wanna see my friends kids grow-up, and other friends grow in their confidence and careers and homes. I created a bucket list to help.

I wish I could tell you that the 5 years since have been easier. They haven’t. Even just under 3 weeks ago I was in the Emergency Room with suspected clots. Needles, needles, needles, so many needles, fevers, infections, a never-ending-headache, severe mucositis, so-much-pain, anti-nausea drugs that results in weeks of lost memories, teeth issues, corneal damage, a slate of other issues a little too graphic to write about, crazy painful out-of-nowhere leg cramps…

…all bumps along the road. But these past 5+ years have been really good to me (outside of the health stuff).

I do feel more and more slowly ‘normal’ with every year that passes, despite wanting it to come quicker, and gaining newer or older issues along the way, some weeks are really truly crippling bad – but the good out-weights the bad ones now. I’m not sure if I’ll ever get back to my old self. But maybe that’s just as well?

Because here’s the thing,  as Mark Brown said in his lecture on hope: hope cannot be transferred like a credit card balance. The hope that we feel for someone cannot substitute for the despair and grief and anger and sadness that they feel for themselves. (I learnt this the hard way. ) So, to make hope happen we must first understand what it is and secondly understand why it might be absent. To understand its absence we must understand what depletes it, what stunts it, what pours salt upon its roots and what blights it when and if it ever flowers.”

I never would have ever believed that people would have come together for me in the way that they did in my times of need.

I realise that sometimes we need these long quiet intervals when we can drift ourselves away a little bit from the current. To gain some perspective. To see how far we’ve come, because sometimes when you’re in the dark, it’s hard to see how strong the current has been. Plus it’s always the best feeling in the world is coming back.

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This morning as I sat looking up at the sky in the glass carriage, I saw uncountable stars. The wind in the valley murmurs at the approach of the sun and I find myself fixed on the single small spark of Venus as the stars silently surrender to the light. The first light of day finds my eye and we are connected.

Today, standing here with the mountains, the first light suddenly feels like the. first. light. and I breathe it in with both soul and senses. Here we can remake the world by understanding the world in all its messy, horrific, amazing glory.

A couple of years ago I was on a plane from NYC to the UK because I was dying.

Today I’m on day 3 of 4, on a train crossing the Canadian wilderness, a lil bit worse for wear (i need a shower pretty bad and i’m still harbouring all of my health issues) but I feel more alive than I have in a very long time.

( I Wrote this 3 days ago,I’m now in Seattle, WA – USA!)

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The Year of Zinc

I’ve not blogged in ages. I keep reflecting, but it’s stored in hidden word documents on my laptop – sometimes making an appearance at a conference, or on my Facebook – in the safety of friends and not just the internet-public.

But I’ve been thinking about getting to 30. Alive. I really can’t believe it.

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On the periodic table 30  is the element Zinc. Roughly one third of all metallic zinc produced today is used in a process known as galvanization. During galvanization, an object that is subject to corrosion, such as an iron nail, is given a protective coating of zinc. I like the idea that my new decade is started with the year of Zinc: an element that is most useful in trying to stop corrosion.

5 years ago, an event happened that changed my life. Some of you where there, and others have followed the progress reports. But, honestly, i think it’ll take a full ten years for me to understand the impact and outcome of that one event.

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Life in many ways is like a paint by numbers book, where you can colour, one tiny bit at a time but within invisible lines. The whole picture emerges much later. Perhaps Steve Jobs said it best:

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever.”

A decade ago, today, if you had asked me today if my life would turn out the way it has done — I wouldn’t have been able to answer that question. In many ways, life has been so much better than I ever really thought it would be!
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Getting to 30 isn’t really big news, but it’s a biggie for me, and ANY of my friends will vouch for me – I never thought I would make it to here. I thought this at high-school. I guess living in abject poverty makes you feel like this – like there’s no future. And this was even before I fell sick. But then when I did fall sick, I would look at what was happening to me and how i felt and thought for sure I wouldn’t be alive by now. At times, I actually didn’t want to live. Like, I just felt like I couldn’t live with this kind of pain – for the rest of my life – without someone understanding what this experience was doing to me with me.

So, I’m really grateful to be getting here.

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Despite this being kinda big news for me, i’m surprisingly anxious about it all too. I still feel 21 in my head. I still get I.D’d for booze at bars & M&S when buying BucksFizz, and if I’m really trying it on, I can still get Teen cinema tickets at the local Odeon.
My life is that of an 18 year olds. I moved back home, have no kids, no pension, basically a few $ in savings, the worst credit history – ever. I’m still a student, albeit I prefer researcher now (PhD). But getting really sick in my 20’s kind of funked things up a bit. I lost time for making and meeting people and things. I lost confidence, and money and I spent a whole lot of it when I got it — YOLOing or trying to find cures for my fatigue (all didn’t work BTW).
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By societies standards, I’m not a success. And I can feel it. I should have *done more* by now. People my age are consultants and own houses, and head-teachers and more. And it’s hard not to compare yourself. But in my own standards (and I think this is what matters) I’m relatively happy with where I am right now.
I mean, I am alive. I do think about that a lot.
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Confronting mortality makes you ask some fundamental questions of yourself and your relationships. It makes you a lot more honest with yourself. It forces you to say no more often, for you know the fleeting nature of life, the minuscule time we have on the planet and what matters is how we choose to spend it. And how you choose to act aswell.
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But 30 years is a long time to have witnessed change and fragility.  Over the past 5 years of ‘illness’, I realised that BEING alive and FEELING alive are 2 different things. And what I’ve learnt over 30 years is what Oprah’s words from her Golden Globes speech encapsulated:

“What I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool you have.”

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I recently read Dr Rod Kersh’s response to Henry Marsh’s guardian article  on the treatment by the legal system and the media, of a transplant surgeon scaring in his initials into patients livers.

And it got me thinking about empathy, and dignity, and teams and Zinc. Rod is one of the most compassionate (& innovative) doctors I know.  I first met him like 5 years ago. It was my 3rd time ever at a hospital appointment. I still hadn’t learnt how to “behave” in these situations (i think i still struggle with what to say and what not to mention even now).  But I still remember our first clinic with clarity, exact words and phrases. He told me how he was going to treat/talk to me (like an equal).  And it properly threw me. I thought about it for weeks afterwards. It was a weird thing to say. But it properly made me feel like I could trust him, that I (my life) was important. This phrase was further backed up by his actions, because in trying to describe what was happening to me, i described it more in how these symptoms was really hindering my life. And he was super intrigued by this. He’s the only doctor (except the ENT doctor this week who was genuinely concerned with my massive hearing loss and my quality of life/future) who seemed to gauge what was important to me. I noticed that when people didn’t hear me out, it made me feel more desperate. (That’s not to say everyone else I see or have seen don’t care… because that’s simply not true at all, but there’s a difference in acknowledging).

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He, and a few of my HCP, inspired me to be the best healthcare professional I could be. I subconsciously learnt what was good care and what wasn’t as good as that. And now everytime I am with a patient, I remember what is important to me when I am in this system. And the differences in actions and languages. And I want to make sure people feel seen and heard. Feel like whatever they’re telling me that is bothering them in their lives, that it matters. That they matter. Despite whatever is happening. Because often people just want to be heard.

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Many forget that it’s a rare privilege to find something you care about so deeply and be able to make it part of your life. For me, I realize that it makes sense that 30 is Zinc.  I am so endlessly grateful. These years have gifted me experiences, skills, lessons, and friendships. I would not be me without them because these people: my friends, teams, colleagues, working together – have acted like Zinc. 

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They have provided me with a coating, that has helped to ease the corrosion of life (from art, to work, to learning, to sickness and more). And in doing so have taught me how to be Zinc too.

You will never regret offering dignity to others.

We rarely get into trouble because we overdo our sense of justice and fairness. Not just us, but where we work, the others we influence. Organizations and governments are nothing but people, and every day we get a chance to become better versions of ourselves.

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And yet… in the moments when we think no one is looking, when the stakes are high, we can forget. It’s worth remembering that justice and dignity aren’t only offered on behalf of others.

Offering people the chance to be treated the way we’d like to be treated benefits us too. It goes around.

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The false scarcity is this: we believe that shutting out others, keeping them out of our orbit, our country, our competitive space—that this somehow makes things more easier for us.

But today, value isn’t created by filling a slot, it’s created by connection. By the combinations created by people. By the magic that comes from diversity of opinion, background and motivation. Connection leads to ideas, to solutions, to breakthroughs.

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The false scarcity stated as, “I don’t have enough, you can’t have any,” is more truthfully, “together, we can create something better.”

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And going forwards in setting the tone to my next decade is just that. To be Zinc: to help, share, collaborate and support. To be compassionate and empathetic.  I will do whatever it takes.

I just like to take this moment to say thank you to everyone in my life who have gotten me here too (from everything). I love y’all! Keep being awesome!

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Expect anything worthwhile to take a lot of time

Yesterday I went to the Drawing Matters Symposium in York. It was a day of inspiring talks and presentations, all grappling with drawing and its pros and cons. I even met a couple of healthcare professionals (a nurse & a physio) using drawing in their PHDs – as a critical tool too, not just a “wellbeing” tool*

There was a particularly interesting talk from an educator about drawings role in primary education, and how a lack of teachers understanding of drawing and time to do it/teach it (all documented in Ofsted reviews every 3 years) is affecting how people later on in life construct and evaluate knowledge. This then, of course, systemically affects every area we work in – from government policies, to leadership, to how things are designed.

They also showed how drawing also helps bilingual kids learn english. So drawing can help bridge across two different languages, two different paradigms. Enhance collaboration and share practices!

But the knowledge thing got me thinking about the healthcare system.

I’ve been trying to make things to help showcase people’s work within radiotherapy & beyond and I’ve been *secretly* developing  a framework/workshops to teach healthcare students (maybe even staff) to be and think creatively.
The workshops are designed to be facilitate hands-on activities and discussion designed to build 4 essential creative muscles:

  1. Seeing connections between disparate concepts
  2. Developing an openness to new ideas
  3. Building resilience through experimentation
  4. Authentic reflection

These 4 things goes beyond what most people think of when we say creativity (no, it’s not just drawing, and it’s not just being “different”). In business, the creative mindset is highly sought-after because in this time of incredible uncertainty and rapid change, we need agile thinkers who can recognize patterns and interesting adjacencies, who naturally come up with person centred solutions not rigid-1-fits all master plans, and who are comfortable conducting rapid experiments to learn quickly. But it’s not as much appreciated  in healthcare, despite needing the same kind of things as described above.

But alas,  both healthcare and creativity is complicated.

For years, researchers have studied the “bias against creativity” in the workplace. University of Pennsylvania researchers coined this phrase for the tendency of creative ideas – and the people who espouse them – to be systematically diminished, disparaged, and discredited. This is interesting stuff. I’ve personally experienced it at school, across many places I’ve worked, including within the healthcare system too.

In recent work from Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, economists took a novel approach to innovation research by matching tax data to patent grants and applications for almost two decades in the US. They found that children of parents in the top 1% of the income distribution were “ten times more likely to become inventors than those in the bottom 50%.” This is significant, but perhaps not that surprising. The fact that you’re more likely to be successful if your parents have money isn’t the classical narrative of the American dream, but we know it’s true. This data is reproduced across the UK too.

The real surprise in the research was that invention was not correlated with creative ability. Instead, the degree of successful invention was more closely tied to environmental factors shaped by race, class and gender. The conditions children were exposed to at a young age in their neighborhoods and schools were the dominant factor in predicting future success in innovation. In other words, if children didn’t see members of their family or community engaging in non-traditional, innovative pursuits, the financial barriers related to access to opportunity were virtually impossible to beat. It didn’t matter how naturally talented someone was if they had nothing to model.

This makes me think back to the healthcare system and the transformational leadership role and HCP ability to enact change – whatever band/level/experience they have.

“Creativity” may not be the magic bullet – but creative people are. We know that intentionally or not, we are teaching the next generation how to be good foot soldiers, but not independent thinkers. More confoundingly, we know that the things we design (whether policies, products, systems, services, pathways, leaflets, etc) we will use in the future to communicate and convene, work and drive and govern will be built by a cosseted minority who have great access, but may not have the greatest ideas. And even if they do, they will not represent the diversity that they could have.

The experience of engaging in the creative process is profoundly transformative for people, especially young people. Moreover, it’s something where each of us can have outsized impact, just by simply being present.

So how do we do this?

First step: embed it back into education and learning.

Organization design – the attempt to structure systems to produce the outcomes we want – has been an established field for decades and healthcare is an amazing example of this. But here’s the thing – if you step back a bit, putting the two words “organization” and “design” next to each other is actually quite contradictory — the historical rigidity of a typical organization, next to the inherent complexity of the humans in that system, combined with the fluidity of design.

The healthcare paradigm is a tricky thing to navigate. It’s so ensteeped and rigid in empirical  data and conservative methods that it’s hard to move things. Each coupling reveals a tension between chaos and structure; linearity and the non-linear; closed and open systems.  Teaching people to be flexible and open – and fun – will show them their potential and feel more confident is being more critical and open about their world and collaboration around them.

Step 2: We need to Challenge the world around us.

At the 99U Conference, Liz Jackson, founder of the Inclusive Fashion + Design Collective said: “You never see a person on a cycling sign. You see one on a wheelchair sign. You’re saying you can’t use that object unless you are that person,” as she strode the stage with the aid of a cane. “We are disabled not by our bodies but by the world around us. It is a social construct. Disability is nothing more than a brand, the world’s ugliest brand.”

The stuff we ignore, or don’t try and change, creates our world – makes it harder for us to do our jobs, our lives and our patients lives. So by giving people the tools to critically think, to be open, to try stuff, we can literally make a difference. Equally, to repress what makes us unique is to artificially constrain all the potential we have to offer. 

Step 3: Learning different ways of thinking to see from different perspectives

This is where a creative education works. Sometimes we all need to step back—be an artist or a healthcare manager— to find the most appropriate methods or  solutions for the problems. You don’t have to do everything yourself, and it doesn’t always have to be a questionnaire or RCT.   Equally, we need to  increase awareness of our biases (which we have MANY in healthcare) and begin to advocate for change, Norregaard recommends creating a space with your team where it’s okay to talk through our biases.

Step 4: Believe in the learning loop.

We teach reflection well in healthcare, but I’d argue not in a way that’s super conducive to working life and transformation. We know that hospital Trusts that are transparent and have an open culture to mistakes, make less big mistakes overall, and have higher quality care outcomes. This isn’t by mistake. Reflecting upon what you do, enables you to work out where things can be better. But the trick is about making reflection natural, critical, authentic – actually empowering and enjoyable and  not like a chore, it’s tick box excerise for just your license. Creative thinking does this.

 

However, even with all of this – we know culture doesn’t change over night and there will always be people high-up that can not see the benefit in such things. Expect anything worthwhile to take a lot of time, but in the meantime – the artist in me has taught me that if you don’t or can’t get a seat at the table – just bring a folding chair.

Having ideals is like having a compass that always points to your heart instead of your brain. If anybody wants to keep creating they have to be about change. Likewise, if anybody wants to be about change, they need to create.

 

 

(*side note: I believe the arts are incredibly important in theraputics however that’s a whole different debate).