What My Teeth Are Teaching Me About My Past & Politics

It’s been a while since I’ve blogged. And certainly, this blog will seem a bit more “off brand” than normal – because it’s about my Teeth.  Have I ever written about my teeth like this before? No, no I haven’t.

In fact, until around 9 months ago, I just didn’t even think about my teeth at all.

Here is a fun fact about me:  I am kind-of scared of the dentist. I know dentists are cool, great & amazingly smart and skilled people – but the environment & process of dental care FREAKS ME OUT.

I don’t know where this fear has come from. I think I learned it from my mom, who also hates going to the dentist and is probably worse than me at attending.  Until this year, my nan had to make all my dental appointments & take me because she knew I wouldn’t have done so myself.  Both my mom and I probably wouldn’t even be still registered with a dentist if it wasn’t for my nan. (Praise the nan!) And let me tell y’all, it’s HARD to get on a good NHS dentist list these days.

This is all interesting because whilst I’ve always known to brush my teeth 2 times a day, and “look after them” & reduce my acidic & sugar intakes and likes – I’ve just never appreciated the importance of what my oral health, care & history means on my general overall health.

Because I’ve grown up in a very precarious life – issues of not sure if money/food would make it to the end of the week, crappy food at school, things like stress from domestic violence & homelessness makes it so you don’t really pay attention to something that is just a given.  Because I’m genetically really lucky with my teeth (I had to have something good in these genes!), my teeth are all kinda naturally straight and normal looking. I’ve not even had any wisdom teeth yet. As such, because they’ve just been chill – i took them for granted whilst the super invasive stuff of my life took over.

I quickly learned from around age 13 that Coca-Cola was a great thing for energy. A natural night owl left me sleep-deprived, alongside having to be semi-aware for aggressive behaviour in the house.  It was cheaper than the food that would get me that same energy, so I could save my dinner money for other things I needed instead, or if there was no dinner money.  It was caffeinated & kept me full for quite a long time.  And so the semi-addiction to Coca-cola happened, and so did the true start of my poor teeth health.

My dentist at the time just never really communicated to/with me. He knew I wasn’t a fan of going to him and he could see what I was doing with my teeth – but never really broached the subject. Until I was around 18 when he told me that now I was an adult he could tell me that I was brushing away all the enamel from my teeth after consuming sugary drinks, so I should wait at least 2-3 hours before brushing. Why didn’t he tell me this literally 4 years earlier now that I had a mouth full of fillings?   So many questions & potential answers.

It was around the age of 17 that I started to feel a deep shame about my teeth. But it wasn’t strong enough yet & I didn’t understand it enough to pay too much attention to this feeling about it every time i brushed my teeth.

I started doing that, the waiting to brush my teeth, rather than giving up the Cola. Now I was a university student with no money either. Which was fine. My upbringing had prepared me for this lifestyle. Needs for new fillings became less with this new info of waiting to brush my teeth, but the dentist would opt for replacing old fillings if he couldn’t find new cavities.   But now the shame of all of this had really started to seep in.

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Occasionally, somehow, people’s teeth would come up at uni. “I’ve never had a filling!” many people would joyfully announce. Some people would say, with shame, how they had to have 1 or 2 fillings, but they only happened when they were younger! Never now!

 

I’d just pretend I hadn’t heard the convo quite often. For me, my teeth were half mental. Luckily all of the fillings were on my molars and pre-molars. But there was a shame I couldn’t explain about my oral health.  It was a bit like smoking, I guess. You know it’s bad for you – but you do it anyways. I felt that if I was brushing my teeth – and coca-cola helped me get through some super tough times with lack of money and energy / good food then it should have been fine. I mean, it was just a drink & I was doing what I was told with brushing. But what I hadn’t clocked around about now, was that my uni friends didn’t have any cavities or many, and were ultra proud of this status because they had much more secure home life & came from more money than me.  It was that middle class, affluent bubble again, that comes in many disguises. Still, I knew that I was responsible – ultimately – for my teeth. Poor background or not.

Over the past years, I have dramatically lowered my consumption of full-sugar drinks like Coke. I do a lot of a ZERO & MAX low calorie no sugar drinks now.  But they’re still carbonated & acidic.

 

The last time before this year that I went to the dentist was in 2016 after I had finished Radiotherapy. One of my back teeth had cracked (from a stress clenching that my dentist never told me i was doing ). I was eating some chocolate after my last case-discussion & a whole massive chip came off my tooth and  i was due to go to USA for the summer. No way did I want potential toothache in USA so I went to the dentist where he proceeded to fix my tooth & gave me more fillings/replaced them.

It was around April 2018 – and that same filling from 2016 fell out. I told myself I’d go to the dentist as soon as I had saved up the money.  I had saved up the money but I was still refusing in my mind to get it fixed.  It didn’t hurt or anything, just annoying when food would get stuck. I kept telling myself, I just don’t have the time. I was very reluctant to pay to feel super bad at the dentist from shame and fear. I left it, whilst I kept telling myself I’d do it soon.

In November last year, I got really sick. I was running 40+ C temp, but no one could figure out what the infection was.   I went to Budapest a few weeks later for my friends birthday weekend, whilst on long-course antibiotics. We were out in a ruin bar, and it was so cold it started to snow. I was drinking a Coke (i still felt gross so alcohol wasn’t for me).  It was there where I got the worlds worst ear ache/face pain. It was proper NEURALGIA. induced by me messing around my TMJ & the cold. The panic overcame me when i thought it could be my teeth. i sat there outside checking my teeth like a crazy person but they didn’t hurt. the gums looked fine. No signs or redness of abscesses. But the pain was INTENSE.

I let that face pain go on until Jan 2019 where it was getting more and more frequent and intense.

I made my 1st ever dentist appointment (remember that my nan had done them all until now) & it had been so long since I had been that my old dentist had retired.

in the meantime between the new appointment, I started googling potential causes of the pain & convinced myself that I had gum disease. It matched everything I had subconsciously told myself about my worth & my habits. I even got my affulent PHD mates to show me their gums – and even though I’m not dentist, i knew their oral health was better than mine.

I went to my appointment & I said to the new dentist that I was nervous (he was like “why it’s just a check-up?” & I was like *I know* but still dunno). I said I had the insane FACE pain, but none of my teeth hurt. I had convinced it was an upper wisdom tooth coming through, not anything to do with the lower filling-less molar as the pain wasn’t no where near my lower jaw. He checked it all out & told me it wasn’t the wisdom tooth  but he might need to remove the fillingless tooth if  he couldn’t fix it.

(I’m leaving out the part where he questioned my dental history accuracy due to the previous dentist filling out my dental record inaccurately?! And made out that I had done dental elsewhere – what a trust exercise!?) 

 

A potential tooth removed.  I ask if it would hurt, he said the no-dental procedure should hurt. LOL LOL LOL. He said I would need a long appointment. I booked it & paid, relieved that I didn’t have gum disease.

On the day of the filling, he told me he couldn’t do it as the tooth was “far too gone”. He said he could take it out now. He couldn’t even do root canal because something had grown? I asked him if i had caused for it to get like this because i had waited so long.  He was a nice dentist though and said it wasn’t my fault. Instantly trying to help me unshame myself.

 

(i do think it was because I did leave it too long, but it was nice of him to not blame me).   OK i thought, I’m sure i can let him remove this tooth, RIGHT NOW. He was really good. He explained everything, and talked me through it all. I never knew until now that I actually had a choice in dental treatment. my previous dentist would just *do it* No real discussion.

There’s a funny story in this tooth removal process – like the fact that I had gone to this appointment on my bike- apparently you can’t ride a bike after surgery? who knew! and i wanted to go straight to work- to lecture. but i actually couldn’t talk. good times.

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But a root got left behind. The dentist let me keep my tooth. I don’t know why i said yes like a weirdo – but I guess I thought that since I had paid £60, i might as well keep it as a reminder.  He made me come back to him for 2 follow up appointments, which i thought was very good.

 

In the meantime, I started researching tooth stuff. And I became shook about the link between social inequality and ACES and oral health & loss of teeth.

Current dental research focuses on health conditions such as diabetes and lung disease that can be risk factors for oral health.

Haena Lee, a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, assessed the impact of adverse childhood events on oral health—specifically, total tooth loss—later in life. These events included childhood trauma, abuse, and, to a lesser extent, smoking.

“The significant effects of these adverse experiences during childhood on oral health are persistent over and above diabetes and lung disease, which are known to be correlates of poor oral health,” Lee says.

Lee drew data from the 2012 Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal study of older adults and their spouses in the United States. The study includes a core survey collected every two years and a supplemental survey every off year. In 2015, the supplemental survey asked detailed information about childhood family history.

Lee derived the participants’ oral health information from the 2012 HRS core survey and their childhood experiences, adult educational attainment, and poverty status from previous HRS surveys and the 2015 supplemental survey.

Using this data, she investigated three models of life course research: the sensitive period, defined as the time in a person’s life during which events have the most impact on his or her development; the accumulation model, which examines the effect of the accumulation of events over the life course; and the social mobility model, which examines the change in a person’s socioeconomic status during that person’s life.

Conclusion? Failing oral health in older adults, especially total tooth loss, may have its roots in adverse experiences such as childhood trauma, abuse, and low educational attainment. Findings also suggest that oral health in later life may be more influenced by accumulation of adversity rather than changes in social and economic position over the life course.

Read more about this incredible (american) study here: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/cdoe.12463

 

After i had that tooth out & did this research – and saw why i felt shame for my teeth. They’re a sign of all the shit I’ve had to endure- abuse, homelessness, poverty, massive amount of stress and chronic illness. – it’s a record dug deep into my bones, and my shorted DNA now – that makes it look like I’m thick or that just don’t give a shit. And that my dentist of 15 years just didn’t really care about to ask or tell me stuff.

The trauma I’ve endured means I *REALLY* don’t like people looking in any of my holes where I have little control or can’t see. So that’s probably why I’m bad at smear uptakes too.  So it’ has helped to tell the new dentist I DO NOT LIKE this. And he explains everything now. (I also told my dr I wasn’t a fan of smears & she made them better too)

AFter the tooth out, I have become a bit obsessed about trying to look after my teeth better than I have ever done in the past. Plus, I have a bit of money that i can spend on this stuff now – where as 2 years ago I couldn’t even buy a general food shop. 

(i’m still drinking carbonated drinks – ooooops) But I bought my first ever supersonic toothbrush. WOW. Here’s another reason why poor people tend not to have brushed their teeth correctly – electric toothbrushes are INSANE & you can feel the difference.  And my teeth LOOK whiter!!! FOR REALS.  Now of course, we know that electric toothbrushes are obvs a defining difference between folks with flexible incomes and the poor (for those of us on a megabudget but enough to buy a new electric toothbrush – this is an amazing tooth brush for £21 https://www.amazon.co.uk/Electric-Toothbrush-Fairywill-Charged-Rechargeable/dp/B07M9ML7XP/ref=sr_1_3_sspa?keywords=sonic+toothbrush&qid=1563721336&s=gateway&sr=8-3-spons&psc=1 )

But this toothbrush came with instructions of how to brush my teeth & it’s timed. I thought I was brushing my teeth for 2 mins. Turns out I really wasn’t. And I didn’t know of the correct technique? 

I started really routinely flossing my teeth, but I had to watch youtube videos to help me learn how to do it properly?! Turns out I only know how to floss from TV & movies – and they just slosh some thread between your teeth. Which is alright – but it’s not the good/correct way to floss!? WHO KNEW? Why has this never been shown to me before? Apparently, you’re supposed to almost wrap the floss around each side of your teeth. Makes sense now I think about it!  I found Dental Hygiene with Whitney (Teeth Tooth Girl) – who is pretty amazing. She makes dental health look cool, fun and easy. Here’s a video of atalk through a dental cleaning (in USA): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uTiC467dwUM&list=FL3F7cPjI9Wp7P1uf9RTl8JQ&index=9&t=0s 

It’s wild to think I’m having to find how to do  this stuff ONLINE – MANY years later.

This mouthwash is gross but it really makes your gums amazing: https://www.corsodyl.co.uk/products/corsodyl/mouthwash/ And now I can eat ice-cream by biting into it!? I’ve not ever been able to do this for as long as I can remember without it hurting.

I usually chase it with it’s nicer tasting mouthwash: https://www.corsodyl.co.uk/products/mouthwash/ (fresh mint)

Though I’ve been using this recently as it was on offer and it’s like setting your moth ALIGHT lol. https://www.listerine.co.uk/products/fresh-breath/listerine-total-care wicked fresh breath though.

My dentist helpfully showed me this lil baby cute tooth to help brush hard to reach areas too : https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wisdom-Interspace-Super-Slim/dp/B01NB08GMX/ref=asc_df_B01NB08GMX/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=310836173466&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=11693902512502109974&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9046280&hvtargid=aud-545671390501:pla-563452080186&psc=1

This past week, I got to see a MAXFAX doctor for the root of my tooth. And what i found out is another blog post for anyone struggling with facepain, TMJ, ear ache & chronic headaches. So come back for that.

BUT why did I write this post?

In my research I learned that Kids, after virus’ in the UK, the 2nd highest reason for hospital admission is due to tooth decay.  I’ve just had to find out how to properly look after my teeth, like technique, materials, length, etc – myself because no one was able to actively show me when i was growing up. Not even my dentist.

I’m working in Public Health & lots of my contracts tend to be about healthy active lifestyles – and yet i’ve come across very little in my research and events that I attend about this HUGE lack of compassionate & fun dental public health care. When i looked into the funding of it, it’s basically VERY VERY small. This isn’t fair & it isn’t right.

I feel ashamed about my oral health and there’s so many people out there like me. But i just wanted to say – don’t feel bad about it. It’s happened now,  I can’t help all the shit situations I have been in. But it doesn’t mean everything else around us has to pretend our painful lives don’t exist. lets get better going forwards. Lets take the stigma out of this stuff, because we’re not doing a very good job in the first place in ensuring people have the right knowledge to begin with, they can’t access to some of the better tools to help do it well and dental practices & research needs to be better at assessing a more holistic approach as to why people are doing things which might be bad for them, and help them with it. Rather than pretending it’s not there or the person just doesn’t care.

If you got to the bottom  of this post, you probably needed to hear this too.

Let’s change make dental public health higher up on the agenda

 

 

 

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